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    Frequently Asked Questions

    For JIGSAW 3-11 and 11-16

    • Common Statutory Questions

      • If we use Jigsaw 3-11, will we meet the requirements for statutory Relationships and Health Education 2020?

        Both the content and the approach of Jigsaw means that schools delivering their PSHE through the Jigsaw Programme will fully meet DfE requirements, subject of course, to schools delivering the scheme with fidelity.
         
        This includes teaching and learning about different kinds of relationships (including online), staying safe, drug education, keeping healthy and learning about the changes that puberty will bring.
         
        Jigsaw also provides detailed mapping documents showing exactly where each of the statutory statements is taught in the programme, so that schools can see where they can adapt or extend any of this content further to meet any specific needs of their school community.

        Find the RSE Guidance here.

      • How does Jigsaw 3-11, contribute towards the Council for International Schools (CIS) Accreditation?

        Jigsaw is an integrated scheme of learning with particular emphasis on emotional literacy, mental health, social, moral, cultural and spiritual development as well as physical health education.

        It provides teachers with detailed, weekly lesson plans and all the resources needed to deliver an engaging and relevant, spiral Health and Well-being curriculum.

        Jigsaw contributes significantly to all four areas of focus of the CIS Accreditation framework, particularly (but not exclusively) in the domains of: Purpose and direction, The Curriculum, Teaching and Assessing, and Well-being.

        The expectations set out in the Wellbeing domain are extensively covered through Jigsaw’s spiral curriculum and we have clear mapping documents enabling schools to clearly see how and where each of the mileposts is taught within the programme.

        Mindfulness philosophy and practice are woven throughout making Jigsaw a unique, progressive and effective scheme of work for this area of the curriculum.

        Jigsaw addresses the needs of children today and will continue to do so by keeping the materials updated and relevant. Our whole-school approach, aims to equip children for life, helping them really know and value who they are and how they relate to other people in this ever-changing world

      • If we use Jigsaw 3-11, will we meet the requirements for the statutory statements for PD+MU?

        Both the content and the approach of Jigsaw means that schools delivering their PSHE through the Jigsaw Programme will fully meet the Department’s requirements for PD+MU, subject of course, to schools delivering the scheme with fidelity.

        This includes teaching and learning on different kinds of relationships (including online), staying safe, drug education, keeping healthy and learning about the changes that puberty will bring.

        Jigsaw also provides detailed mapping documents showing exactly where each of the statutory statements is taught in the programme, so that schools can see where they can adapt or extend any of this content further to meet any specific needs for their school community.

      • If we use Jigsaw 3-12, will we meet the requirements for the statutory statements for the Health and Wellbeing Experiences and Outcomes and Benchmarks for Personal and Social Education?

        Jigsaw is an integrated scheme of learning with particular emphasis on emotional literacy, mental health, social, moral, cultural and spiritual development as well as physical health education. It provides teachers with detailed, weekly lesson plans and all the resources needed to deliver an engaging and relevant, spiral Health and Well-being curriculum.

        The expectations set out in the Curriculum for Excellence for Health and Wellbeing are comprehensively covered through Jigsaw’s spiral curriculum, with mindfulness philosophy and practice woven throughout making Jigsaw is a unique, progressive and effective scheme of work for this area of the curriculum.

        Jigsaw addresses the needs of children today and will continue to do so by keeping the materials updated and relevant. Our whole-school approach, aims to equip children for life, helping them really know and value who they are and how they relate to other people in this ever-changing world.

        Find the Benchmarks Guidance here.

      • If we use Jigsaw 3-11, will we meet the requirements for the Curriculum for Wales RSE Guidance 2022 and the Area of Learning for Health and Wellbeing?

        Both the content and the approach of Jigsaw means that schools delivering their PSHE through the Jigsaw Programme will enable schools to fully meet the Curriculum for Wales requirements for RSE that become statutory in September 2022.
         
        The expectations set out in the Health and Wellbeing AoL are also all comprehensively covered through Jigsaw’s spiral curriculum, ensuring that pupils have every chance to become ethical, informed citizens of Wales and the world.
         
        Jigsaw also provides detailed mapping documents showing exactly where each of the statutory statements is taught in the programme, so that schools can see where they can adapt or extend any of this content further to meet any specific needs for their school community.
      • If we use Jigsaw 11-16, will we meet the requirements for statutory RSE and the AoL for Health and Wellbeing?

        Both the content and the approach of Jigsaw means that schools delivering their PSHE through our 11-16 programme will fully meet the new requirements for RSE in secondary schools, subject of course, to schools delivering the scheme with fidelity.

    • Common Content Questions

      • Does Jigsaw support the Safeguarding agenda, including Sexual Harassment and Peer-on-Peer Abuse?

        Ofsted has stated that schools and colleges should be safe environments where children and young people can learn. Put simply, Jigsaw helps to teach children about the keeping themselves safe and promotes an ethos in school that strongly supports keeping children safe in many diverse situations.

        From the Early Years onwards, children are taught about what to say and do if they don’t like something – from encountering strangers to bullying, and from unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology. As ever, the emphasis is on helping children realise their independence and responsibility for themselves, rather than employing scare tactics and horror stories to frighten children and dissuade them from choosing certain paths.

        This content reflects the most up-to-date guidance from the DfE and Ofsted around teaching about peer-on-peer abuse and harassment in an age-appropriate way, and we provide clear supporting materials for schools that shows when and how this is taught.

        Find the Ofsted/Dfe Guidance here.

      • How does Jigsaw contribute to British Values education?

        Jigsaw contributes to British Values in every single lesson.

        We have mapped all Jigsaw lessons against the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs and found that all Jigsaw lessons contribute to one or more of these values in some way.

        There are two mapping documents: one showing how each Puzzle contributes overall, and the other demonstrating how each individual lesson contributes.

        For example, as you would expect, the ‘Being Me In My World’ Puzzle covers lots of the values in most lessons, where citizenship is learnt about; but in the ‘Healthy Me’ Puzzle there are also ample opportunities for learning about mutual respect, individual liberty and the rule of law.

        Jigsaw schools can access the British Values map in the Documents section of the Jigsaw Community Area.

      • Does Jigsaw support the prevention of extremism and radicalisation agenda?

        Jigsaw does not cover radicalisation and extremist behaviour explicitly, as the concepts themselves are perhaps not appropriate for teaching about in primary schools: whilst we want to prepare children for life, at the same time we do not want to alarm them.

        Rather, Jigsaw makes a significant contribution towards ensuring that the curriculum and the learning environment that children experience lays down a grounding in which the ideological and emotional roots of extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours cannot flourish.

        This contribution emerges first and foremost through the overall character of the Jigsaw scheme and the learning styles it advocates, but also through many aspects of the specific content of the themes or ‘Puzzles’ that make up the programme.

        Children are taught to know their own minds, to operate from a position of self-awareness and self-valuing, and to develop the capacity to empathise with others. Children develop the skills and confidence in Jigsaw to have respectful discussions around sensitive subjects, and in upper KS2 this includes lessons around topics such as belonging, peer pressure, changing relationships and gangs, which can be built upon in more specific lessons when they reach secondary school.

      • Does Jigsaw have lessons on issues like bullying, racism and Protected Characteristics?

        Our Celebrating Difference Puzzle in the Autumn term truly looks at the diversity in our local and wider communities and the benefits that this brings to us all.

        Within this, there are also lessons looking at what bullying is, why it happens, and how we can all behave in a way that supports each other, including the pros and cons of peer influence, how to say no, where to go for help and how to support others.

        We do not have lessons that single out just one particular group in a lesson such as race, sexuality, disability or gender but these aspects are reflected in the lessons in an age-appropriate way with lessons explaining the importance of the Equality Act and Protected Characteristics in Upper Key Stage 2, when we find pupils are also naturally bringing more questions on these areas to the classroom.

        Jigsaw lessons provide a safe supported environment for having respectful discussions about topics that some adults find difficult to discuss, and we ensure that our planning supports teachers to manage these in a respectful and non-political manner including the use of the Jigsaw charter, the lesson structure and distancing techniques.

        Read More on the RSE Guidance here.

      • Will Jigsaw help us with SMSC?

        Yes. Even if SMSC were not a high priority for Ofsted, we would still value these aspects of children’s development and believe that Jigsaw enhances each of them. We have mapped SMSC across each Puzzle and across each year group to ensure balanced coverage.

        Every Jigsaw Piece (lesson) contributes to this target and our mapping grids clearly indicate which elements are enhanced in each lesson. Every lesson in Jigsaw has 2 learning intentions – one of which is always social and emotional.

        This ensures that not only are the social and emotional aspects of learning included in every lesson, but also that children are encouraged to recognise and value their own learning in these areas.

      • Is the Jigsaw sex education controversial?

        Sex education in primary schools is not statutory like Relationships and Health Education is, but it is recommended by the DfE that all primary schools should deliver this.

        We do not believe our content is controversial. Many of our schools have been using the Jigsaw materials for sex education and puberty for several years confidently with the support of parents and carers. Feedback from our newer schools is positive and indicates that the content is in line with what they would expect from a high-quality PSHE resource. Our sex education content is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values.

        The ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle in Jigsaw 3-11 covers puberty and human reproduction in the context of coping positively with change. It does this in a sensitive and age-appropriate way offering schools teaching materials that meet statutory Relationships and Health Education expectations, and which includes lessons on human reproduction, the coverage of which is at schools’ discretion.

        We also provide leaflets and a parent presentation that schools can use as part of their parental engagement on RSE.

      • Is the RSHE in Jigsaw suitable for Catholic schools?

        The RSHE that we teach in Jigsaw has two main functions: to help children enjoy successful relationships (with friends, siblings, parents, etc.) and to keep them safe, now and in the future.

        The Jigsaw Pieces (lessons) in the Changing Me Puzzle (unit) aim to give children their entitlement to information about puberty and human reproduction, appropriate to their age and stage of development. It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear. We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values and there is a strong safeguarding element to the ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle (as there is throughout Jigsaw).

        The sex education in Jigsaw is progressive and developmental and is naturally built into the Changing Me Puzzle as part of the teaching about how our bodies change in puberty so that we are able to reproduce when we are older.

        The RSHE materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit appropriately with the individual philosophy and ethos of that school. Catholic schools will obviously need to check their own diocesan advice during this process.

        There are lots of Catholic schools using Jigsaw and some of these are implementing the Changing Me materials as they are, others have tweaked them to fit their requirements. For example, in Jigsaw we use specially-designed animations to help teach some of the elements of sex education: most schools use the animations, while some schools choose not to.

        It’s your choice – there is no obligation either way.

        We also have a mapping document for schools showing the parallels between Jigsaw’s approach and content for Relationships, Health and Sex Education with regard to “Learning to Love” as well as the DfE statutory requirements for Relationships and Health Education in Primary Schools (England 2019). This can be used to help you compare the teaching materials with your school’s local diocese guidance.

        Read the Learning to Love Guidance here.

      • Is Financial Education included in Jigsaw?

        Yes. There are numerous opportunities in Jigsaw for teaching and learning about financial capability and economic well-being. The Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

        For the younger year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be better in the future.

        For older year groups, the emphasis is more on jobs and careers, and also on supporting others with fundraising, etc. For example, in Year 5, there are lessons on children’s dream jobs and the steps they need to take to get there, what people in a variety of jobs earn and how everyone makes a contribution in society. The end of Puzzle outcomes also offer opportunities for enterprise and learning about money and finance e.g. building a garden of Dreams and Goals enables children to collaborate to raise money for charity.

        There are also additional lesson plans dealing explicitly with money, spending, saving etc on the Jigsaw website for all our schools to use to supplement the lessons already in the Jigsaw Programme if they wish to.

      • Does Jigsaw include up-to-date content on staying safe online?

        Yes. Jigsaw starts to include teaching and learning about online safety at the end of Key Stage 1 which builds on earlier learning about what makes a good friendship, how to treat others with respect and kindness and what to do if you feel unsafe and might need help.

        As children progress through primary there are specific lessons on online safety, as well as discussions and scenarios built into other lessons on relationships, safety and asking for help that allow exploration of safety around online forums, games, mobile phones and social media.

        These are mapped clearly to the statutory requirements as well as to the Education for a Connected World guidance.

      • How can we use Jigsaw 3-11 when we have composite classes made up of several year groups?

        The whole school approach in Jigsaw means that every year group is studying the same theme at the same time e.g. ‘Celebrating Difference’ in Autumn 2. The same themes are revisited and built upon throughout the programme, always with content that allows the class teacher to assess pupils’ knowledge and understanding through a form of baseline assessment at the beginning of the Puzzle (unit of work) and then guide discussions and activities in response to the pupils’ needs.

        This makes it easier for the teacher to plan and differentiate the teaching and learning for the class they are teaching, whatever the age of the pupils in front of them.

        There are a large number of Jigsaw schools on a 2 year rolling cycle who are able to use the majority of the materials like this with only a handful of lessons needing some adaptation to ensure that the content is fully accessible for all. There are very few lessons within the Puzzles where children are reliant on specific knowledge from a previous year group that is not revisited in the teaching, and we can help you identify the lessons where this may take place if you feel you would like the support.

        These lessons are mostly related to drug education in Healthy Me and puberty and sex education in Changing Me. Some schools choose to adapt these lessons, and some choose to split the classes into smaller groups for parts of them instead some Jigsaw schools are tiny and may have 3 or 4 year groups in one composite class.

        These much smaller schools will find that there will be some more occasions in Key Stage 2 where they will need to split the groups into narrower age groups for at least part of the lessons due the to nature of the topics being discussed (for example in some drug education, puberty and relationships lessons), but the exact needs of each school will vary according to the mix of age groups and how each school approaches this in other curriculum areas.

      • How do I differentiate a Jigsaw lesson for my SEND children?

        The mindfulness approach that we use across each lesson allows pupils of all abilities to access the learning and the nature of the teaching and learning activities makes the learning in Jigsaw more accessible for many SEND children than some other curriculum areas.

        We also have some specific documents to further help you to support SEND children in the classroom relating to Autism, and also an alternative set of Connect Us activities for children with restricted mobility and/or limited language and communication skills.

        The Jigsaw 3-11 mapping and progression documents show how pupils develop their knowledge and understanding about the topics discussed in the classroom as well as their social and emotional learning throughout Jigsaw. This helps class teachers to identify specific areas where the teaching and learning can be adapted to suit the needs of different children, sometimes from an alternative year group’s resources.

        Alongside this, we have mapped the specific lesson planning in Jigsaw with the content that is relevant to the six sections of the PSHE Association’s Planning Framework for pupils with SEND.

        The feedback from schools reinforces that the universal delivery of Jigsaw is successful and promotes pupil voice. This comes through the specific planned content as well as through the development of children’s confidence and skills in communication around different topics.

      • How does Jigsaw contribute to children's mental health?

        There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw helps children learn about mental health; and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health.

        Jigsaw is designed to provide structured opportunities in every lesson to practise and enhance the five skills associated with the emotional literacy (self-awareness, social skills, empathy, motivation and managing feelings).

        Confidence in oneself and awareness of self – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes tricky concepts for children (and adults!) to adopt. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping children to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness which aims to empower children to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives. It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.

        The practice of mindfulness, where children learn to be in the present moment without judgement, is taught in every Jigsaw lesson in 3 different ways:

        The first is through the Calm Me time - through visualisation and through breathing techniques.

        The second is through the ‘Pause Points’ in lessons where children are invited to stop and look inside to practice observing their thoughts and feelings relating to their learning in the lesson.

        The third is through the other parts of the taught curriculum where children explore their thoughts and feelings, expand their emotional vocabulary, learn about and reflect on the thoughts/feelings/consequences sequences, build their confidence and express themselves in a safe environment.

        The Healthy Me Puzzle is where most of the ‘traditional’ health promotion lessons are. From the food on our plates and the importance of physical activity for a healthy body (and mind) in the earlier year groups, to the more sophisticated health messages about choice, lifestyle and mental and emotional health promotion in the older year groups, children gain a fully experiential approach to holistic health in Jigsaw – and how it is their responsibility to care for and also where they can go for help when they need support.

        The latest guidance recommends that schools needs to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learnt by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every year group.

        A programme like Jigsaw can be so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how children learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health. Each lesson plan includes a social and emotional learning intention so that the purpose of that lesson is clear in terms of children’s emotional development, not just their ‘knowledge learning’.

        Children are able to see and value this and develop the skills to self-assess their learning. Additionally, everything that schools do in Jigsaw can be linked to positive behaviour policy (which is where the Learning Charter work in Being Me in My World is so useful). More intensive intervention work with more vulnerable children is needed, to ensure that all children’s needs are met – at a universal and a targeted level.

        Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for pupils and staff and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values, but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.

      • How does Jigsaw contribute to teachers’ mental health?

        Jigsaw values teachers’ professional judgement and knowledge of how to best support the pupils in their classrooms. We ensure that our programme has all the content and support that a busy teacher needs to deliver high quality PSHE for all the children in the classroom, whatever the topic or political climate.

        We fully expect teachers to adapt the materials in the classroom for the pupils in front of them, but by following the programme structure and learning intentions they can be confident that they are providing a broad and balanced curriculum across the school that will help prepare children for all the different aspects of life beyond the classroom, as well as within it.

        Every teacher in a Jigsaw school has access to a Jigsaw mentor who can help to find documents, explain things that they may have questions about in connection to their class, or simply help to explain how something works when there are a hundred other things in that week they are having to contend with.

        Jigsaw also has additional optional lesson plans on specific topics that schools can use to tackle some specific subject areas that other schools may not need to address such as knife crime, railway safety and FGM. As well as these, we provide leaflets for parents, mapping documents and explanatory articles in all the areas that schools tell us that they need.
        We also ensure that we listen to teacher feedback and make changes or additions wherever we can, and tailor our webinars to meet the areas that teachers tell us that they would like support with.

      • Are the Jigsaw Assemblies important?

        Definitely! Each Jigsaw Puzzle is launched across the whole school at the same time with a specific Puzzle Launch Assembly designed to appeal to all the year groups. These assemblies initiate key learning messages that are then reinforced in the lessons and Weekly Celebrations. This helps maintain focus and intention for both children and staff.

        There is one set of Puzzle Launch Assemblies included in the Jigsaw Programme when you buy it and there are 3 additional sets of Puzzle Launch assemblies available for purchase as part of the Bumper Bundle of assemblies. This Bumper Bundle also includes x36 weekly celebration assemblies which help launch the weekly theme.

        As well as the assembly for each Puzzle, we envisage schools will also hold Celebration/Golden Assemblies that will include reference to what children have been doing in Jigsaw that week.

        These Weekly Celebration Assemblies can be used as part of the Jigsaw scheme or stand-alone and are available now in the Jigsaw online store.

      • Does Jigsaw fit with the Rights Respecting Schools Award?

        Jigsaw aims to empower children to understand their own rights and those of others, and supports the development of global citizenship.

        We have mapped the Jigsaw Puzzles’ contribution to the Rights Respecting Schools Award and to the Universal Convention on the Rights of the Child.

        Many schools successfully integrate the Rights Respecting Charter within the structured delivery of Jigsaw lessons.
      • Does Jigsaw support the safeguarding needs of our schools, including Sexual Harassment and Peer-on-Peer Abuse?

        The International Task Force on Child Protection Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy (2016), explains how schools must have formal learning programmes in place , “which cover areas such as bullying personal safety, physical abuse, manipulation, grooming, online safety, healthy sexual behaviour, neglect and negligent behaviour, self-harm, staying safe away from home, commercial exploitation and disclosing abuse.”
         
        Put simply, Jigsaw helps to teach children about the keeping themselves safe and promotes an ethos in school that strongly supports keeping children safe in many diverse situations.
         
        From the Early Years onwards, children are taught about what to say and do if they don’t like something – from encountering strangers to bullying, and from unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology. 
         
        As ever, the emphasis is on helping children realise their independence and responsibility for themselves, rather than employing scare tactics and horror stories to frighten children and dissuade them from choosing certain paths. 
         
        This content reflects the most up-to-date guidance around teaching about peer-on-peer abuse and harassment in an age appropriate way, and we provide clear supporting materials for schools that shows when and how this is taught.
      • Does Jigsaw support the prevention of extremism and radicalisation agenda?

        Jigsaw does not cover radicalisation and extremist behaviour explicitly, as the concepts themselves are perhaps not appropriate for teaching about in primary schools: whilst we want to prepare children for life, at the same time we do not want to alarm them.

        Rather, Jigsaw makes a significant contribution towards ensuring that the curriculum and the learning environment that children experience lays down a grounding in which the ideological and emotional roots of extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours cannot flourish.

        This contribution emerges first and foremost through the overall character of the Jigsaw scheme and the learning styles it advocates, but also through many aspects of the specific content of the themes or ‘Puzzles’ that make up the programme.

        Children are taught to know their own minds, to operate from a position of self-awareness and self-valuing, and to develop the capacity to empathise with others. Children develop the skills and confidence in Jigsaw to have respectful discussions around sensitive subjects, and in upper KS2 this includes lessons around topics such as belonging, peer pressure, changing relationships and gangs, which can be built upon in more specific lessons when they reach secondary school.

      • Does Jigsaw have lessons on issues like bullying, racism and equality?

        Our Celebrating Difference Puzzle in the Autumn term truly looks at the diversity in our local and wider communities and the benefits that this brings to us all.

        Within this, there are also lessons looking at what bullying is, why it happens, and how we can all behave in a way that supports each other, including the pros and cons of peer influence, how to say no, where to go for help and how to support others.

        We do not have lessons that single out just one particular group in a lesson such as race, sexuality, disability or gender but these aspects are reflected in the lessons in an age-appropriate way with lessons explaining the importance of the Equality Act and Protected Characteristics in Upper Primary, when we find pupils are also naturally bringing more questions on these areas to the classroom.

        Jigsaw lessons provide a safe supported environment for having respectful discussions about topics that some adults find difficult to discuss, and we ensure that our planning supports teachers to manage these in a respectful and non-political manner including the use of the Jigsaw charter, the lesson structure and distancing techniques.

      • Will Jigsaw help us with SMSC?

        At Jigsaw we highly value these aspects of children’s development and believe that Jigsaw enhances each of them. We have mapped SMSC across each Puzzle and across each year group to ensure balanced coverage.

        Every Jigsaw Piece (lesson) contributes to this target and our mapping grids clearly indicate which elements are enhanced in each lesson. Every lesson in Jigsaw has 2 learning intentions – one of which is always social and emotional.

        This ensures that not only are the social and emotional aspects of learning included in every lesson, but also that children are encouraged to recognise and value their own learning in these areas.

      • Is the Jigsaw sex education controversial?

        We do not believe our content is controversial. Many of our schools have been using the Jigsaw materials for sex education and puberty for several years confidently with the support of parents and carers.

        Feedback from our newer schools is positive and indicates that the content is in line with what they would expect from a high-quality PSHE resource. Our sex education content is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values.

        The ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle in Jigsaw 3-11 covers puberty and human reproduction in the context of coping positively with change. It does this in a sensitive and age-appropriate way which includes lessons on human reproduction, the coverage of which is at schools’ discretion.

        We also provide leaflets and a parent presentation that schools can use as part of their parental engagement on RSE.

      • Is the RSHE in Jigsaw suitable for Catholic schools?

        The RSHE that we teach in Jigsaw has two main functions: to help children enjoy successful relationships (with friends, siblings, parents, etc.) and to keep them safe, now and in the future.
         
        The Jigsaw Pieces (lessons) in the Changing Me Puzzle (unit) aim to give children their entitlement to information about puberty and human reproduction, appropriate to their age and stage of development.
         
        It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear. We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values and there is a strong safeguarding element to the ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle (as there is throughout Jigsaw).
         
        The sex education in Jigsaw is progressive and developmental and is naturally built into the Changing Me Puzzle as part of the teaching about how our bodies change in puberty so that we are able to reproduce when we are older.
         
        The RSHE materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit appropriately with the individual philosophy and ethos of that school. Catholic schools will obviously need to check their own diocesan advice during this process.
         
        There are lots of Catholic schools using Jigsaw and some of these are implementing the Changing Me materials as they are, others have tweaked them to fit their requirements. 
         
        For example, in Jigsaw we use specially-designed animations to help teach some of the elements of sex education: most schools use the animations, while some schools choose not to. It’s your choice – there is no obligation either way.
         
        We also have a mapping document for schools showing the parallels between Jigsaw’s approach and content for Relationships, Health and Sex Education with regard to “Learning to Love” . This can be used to help you compare the teaching materials with your school’s local diocese guidance.
         
      • Is Financial Education included in Jigsaw?

        Yes. There are numerous opportunities in Jigsaw for teaching and learning about financial capability and economic well-being. The Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

        For the younger year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be better in the future.

        For older year groups, the emphasis is more on jobs and careers, and also on supporting others with fundraising, etc. For example, in Year 5, there are lessons on children’s dream jobs and the steps they need to take to get there, what people in a variety of jobs earn and how everyone makes a contribution in society.

        The end of Puzzle outcomes also offer opportunities for enterprise and learning about money and finance e.g. building a garden of Dreams and Goals enables children to collaborate to raise money for charity.

        There are also additional lesson plans dealing explicitly with money, spending, saving etc on the Jigsaw website for all our schools to use to supplement the lessons already in the Jigsaw Programme if they wish to.

      • Does Jigsaw include up-to-date content on staying safe online?

        Yes. Jigsaw starts to include teaching and learning about online safety from Age 6-7yrs, which builds on earlier learning about what makes a good friendship, how to treat others with respect and kindness and what to do if you feel unsafe and might need help.

        As children progress through primary there are specific lessons on online safety, as well as discussions and scenarios built into other lessons on relationships, safety and asking for help that allow exploration of safety around online forums, games, mobile phones and social media.

      • How can we use Jigsaw 3-11 when we have composite classes made up of more than one year group?

        The whole school approach in Jigsaw means that every year group is studying the same theme at the same time e.g. ‘Celebrating Difference’ in Autumn 2. The same themes are revisited and built upon throughout the programme, always with content that allows the class teacher to assess pupils’ knowledge and understanding through a form of baseline assessment at the beginning of the Puzzle (unit of work) and then guide discussions and activities in response to the pupils’ needs.

        This makes it easier for the teacher to plan and differentiate the teaching and learning for the class they are teaching, whatever the age of the pupils in front of them.

        There are a large number of Jigsaw schools on a 2 year rolling cycle who are able to use the majority of the materials like this with only a handful of lessons needing some adaptation to ensure that the content is fully accessible for all.

        There are very few lessons within the Puzzles where children are reliant on specific knowledge from a previous year group that is not revisited in the teaching, and we can help you identify the lessons where this may take place if you feel you would like the support. These lessons are mostly related to drug education in Healthy Me and puberty and sex education in Changing Me.

        Some schools choose to adapt these lessons, and some choose to split the classes into smaller groups for parts of them instead some Jigsaw schools are tiny and may have 3 or 4 year groups in one composite class.

        These much smaller schools will find that there will be some more occasions in Key Stage 2 where they will need to split the groups into narrower age groups for at least part of the lessons due the to nature of the topics being discussed (for example in some drug education, puberty and relationships lessons), but the exact needs of each school will vary according to the mix of age groups and how each school approaches this in other curriculum areas.

      • How do I differentiate a Jigsaw lesson for my SEND children?

        The mindfulness approach that we use across each lesson allows pupils of all abilities to access the learning and the nature of the teaching and learning activities makes the learning in Jigsaw more accessible for many SEND children than some other curriculum areas.

        We also have some specific documents to further help you to support SEND children in the classroom relating to Autism, and also an alternative set of Connect Us activities for children with restricted mobility and/or limited language and communication skills.

        The Jigsaw 3-11 mapping and progression documents show how pupils develop their knowledge and understanding about the topics discussed in the classroom as well as their social and emotional learning throughout Jigsaw. This helps class teachers to identify specific areas where the teaching and learning can be adapted to suit the needs of different children, sometimes from an alternative year group’s resources.

        Alongside this, we have mapped the specific lesson planning in Jigsaw with the content that is relevant to the six sections of the PSHE Association’s Planning Framework for pupils with SEND. This is a useful document for schools in all nations of the UK and internationally as it helps teachers to identify where essential building blocks are found in the programme which can then be adapted to individual needs.

        The feedback from schools reinforces that the universal delivery of Jigsaw is successful and promotes pupil voice. This comes through the specific planned content as well as through the development of children’s confidence and skills in communication around different topics.

      • How does Jigsaw make a difference to children's mental health?

        There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw helps children learn about mental health; and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health.
         
        Jigsaw is designed to provide structured opportunities in every lesson to practise and enhance the five skills associated with the emotional literacy (self-awareness, social skills, empathy, motivation and managing feelings).
         
        Confidence in oneself and awareness of self – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes tricky concepts for children (and adults!) to adopt. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping children to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners.
         
        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness which aims to empower children to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives. It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.
         
        The practice of mindfulness, where children learn to be in the present moment without judgement, is taught in every Jigsaw lesson in 3 different ways:
        • The first is through the Calm Me time - through visualisation and through breathing techniques.
        • The second is through the ‘Pause Points’ in lessons where children are invited to stop and look inside to practice observing their thoughts and feelings relating to their learning in the lesson.
        • The third is through the other parts of the taught curriculum where children explore their thoughts and feelings, expand their emotional vocabulary, learn about and reflect on the thoughts/feelings/consequences sequences, build their confidence and express themselves in a safe environment.
        The Healthy Me Puzzle is where most of the ‘traditional’ health promotion lessons are. From the food on our plates and the importance of physical activity for a healthy body (and mind) in the earlier year groups, to the more sophisticated health messages about choice, lifestyle and mental and emotional health promotion in the older year groups, children gain a fully experiential approach to holistic health in Jigsaw – and how it is their responsibility to care for and also where they can go for help when they need support.
         
        The latest guidance recommends that schools needs to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learnt by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every year group.
         
        A programme like Jigsaw can be so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how children learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health. Each lesson plan includes a social and emotional learning intention so that the purpose of that lesson is clear in terms of children’s emotional development, not just their ‘knowledge learning’.
         
        Children are able to see and value this and develop the skills to self-assess their learning. Additionally, everything that schools do in Jigsaw can be linked to positive behaviour policy (which is where the Learning Charter work in Being Me in My World is so useful). More intensive intervention work with more vulnerable children is needed, to ensure that all children’s needs are met – at a universal and a targeted level.
         
        Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for pupils and staff and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values, but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.
      • How does Jigsaw contribute to teachers’ mental health?

        Jigsaw values teachers’ professional judgement and knowledge of how to best support the pupils in their classrooms. We ensure that our programme has all the content and support that a busy teacher needs to deliver high quality PSHE for all the children in the classroom, whatever the topic or political climate.

        We fully expect teachers to adapt the materials in the classroom for the pupils in front of them, but by following the programme structure and learning intentions they can be confident that they are providing a broad and balanced curriculum across the school that will help prepare children for all the different aspects of life beyond the classroom, as well as within it.

        Every teacher in a Jigsaw school has access to a Jigsaw mentor who can help to find documents, explain things that they may have questions about in connection to their class, or simply help to explain how something works when there are a hundred other things in that week they are having to contend with.

        Jigsaw also has additional optional lesson plans on specific topics that schools can use to tackle some specific subject areas that other schools may not need to address such as knife crime, railway safety and FGM. As well as these, we provide leaflets for parents, mapping documents and explanatory articles in all the areas that schools tell us that they need.

        We also ensure that we listen to teacher feedback and make changes or additions wherever we can, and tailor our webinars to meet the areas that teachers tell us that they would like support with.

      • Are the Jigsaw Assemblies important?

        Definitely! Each Jigsaw Puzzle is launched across the whole school at the same time with a specific Puzzle Launch Assembly designed to appeal to all the year groups. These assemblies initiate key learning messages that are then reinforced in the lessons and Weekly Celebrations. This helps maintain focus and intention for both children and staff.

        There is one set of Puzzle Launch Assemblies included in the Jigsaw Programme when you buy it and there are 3 additional sets of Puzzle Launch assemblies available for purchase as part of the Bumper Bundle of assemblies. This Bumper Bundle also includes x36 weekly celebration assemblies which help launch the weekly theme.

        As well as the assembly for each Puzzle, we envisage schools will also hold Celebration/Golden Assemblies that will include reference to what children have been doing in Jigsaw that week. These Weekly Celebration Assemblies can be used as part of the Jigsaw scheme or stand-alone and are available now in the Jigsaw online store.

      • Does Jigsaw fit with the Rights Respecting Schools Award?

        Jigsaw aims to empower children to understand their own rights and those of others, and supports the development of global citizenship.

        We have mapped the Jigsaw Puzzles’ contribution to the Rights Respecting Schools Award and to the Universal Convention on the Rights of the Child.

        Many schools successfully integrate the Rights Respecting Charter within the structured delivery of Jigsaw lessons.

      • How can we assess pupil’s progress in Jigsaw 3-11?

        In the Early Years, Jigsaw identifies assessment opportunities in the lessons.

        From ages 5-11 years, there are built-in assessment opportunities within every lesson, including baseline assessments for teachers to assess how to guide the discussions related to the topics and learning intentions across the whole unit of work.

        These are not written tests, but activities such as continuums or discussions that encourage deeper thinking and reflection. There are then weekly pupil self-assessments in every lesson, as well as summative assessment opportunities built into the last piece of every Puzzle (unit of work).

        Much of the active learning content in Jigsaw is discussion-based, but we encourage the use of individual Jigsaw Journals to keep a record of individual children’s formative assessment from these lessons and any written work and certificates that children receive both in and out of the lessons that are relevant to their learning in PSHE.

        These journals can move through the school with pupils for them to see their own progress, and also be used to help teachers carry out a summative assessment.

      • Does Jigsaw support Safeguarding in school, including Sexual Harassment and Peer-on-Peer Abuse?

        The Department’s updated guidance on safeguarding from 2020 explained how safeguarding goes beyond child protection, and begins with, “preventative education and activities which enable children and young people to grow up safely and securely in circumstances where their development and wellbeing is promoted.” 
         
        Put simply, Jigsaw helps to teach children about the keeping themselves safe and promotes an ethos in school that strongly supports keeping children safe in many diverse situations.
         
        From the Pre-school onwards, children are taught about what to say and do if they don’t like something – from encountering strangers to bullying, and from unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology. 
         
        As ever, the emphasis is on helping children realise their independence and responsibility for themselves, rather than employing scare tactics and horror stories to frighten children and dissuade them from choosing certain paths. 
         
        This content reflects the most up-to-date guidance from the Department and ETI which recommends that schools have a planned preventative programme for RSE as part of PD+MU, with clear policies and starting from the very beginning of school.
         
        Find the Department’s Guidance here.
         
        Jigsaw does not cover radicalisation and extremist behaviour explicitly, as the concepts themselves are perhaps not appropriate for teaching about in primary schools: whilst we want to prepare children for life, at the same time we do not want to alarm them.

        Rather, Jigsaw makes a significant contribution towards ensuring that the curriculum and the learning environment that children experience lays down a grounding in which the ideological and emotional roots of extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours cannot flourish.

        This contribution emerges first and foremost through the overall character of the Jigsaw scheme and the learning styles it advocates, but also through many aspects of the specific content of the themes or ‘Puzzles’ that make up the programme.

        Children are taught to know their own minds, to operate from a position of self-awareness and self-valuing, and to develop the capacity to empathise with others. Children develop the skills and confidence in Jigsaw to have respectful discussions around sensitive subjects, and in Key Stage 2 this includes lessons around topics such as belonging, peer pressure, changing relationships and gangs, which can be built upon in more specific lessons when they reach post-primary school.
      • Does Jigsaw have lessons on issues like bullying, racism and inclusion?

        Our Celebrating Difference Puzzle in the Autumn term truly looks at the diversity in our local and wider communities and the benefits that this brings to us all. Within this, there are also lessons looking at what bullying is, why it happens, and how we can all behave in a way that supports each other, including the pros and cons of peer influence, how to say no, where to go for help and how to support others.

        We do not have lessons that single out just one particular group in a lesson such as race, sexuality, disability or gender but these aspects are reflected in the lessons in an age-appropriate way with lessons explaining the importance of the treating everyone who may be different to ourselves with kindness and respect in Key Stage 2, when we find pupils are also naturally bringing more questions on these areas to the classroom.

        Jigsaw lessons provide a safe supported environment for having respectful discussions about topics that some adults find difficult to discuss, and we ensure that our planning supports teachers to manage these in a respectful and non-political manner including the use of the Jigsaw charter, the lesson structure and distancing techniques.

      • Will Jigsaw help us with children's social and emotional learning as well as knowledge-based learning?

        Yes, indeed! Even if this were not a high priority for ETI, we would still value these aspects of children’s development and believe that Jigsaw enhances each of them. We have mapped Spiritual, Moral, Social and cultural content across each Puzzle and across each year group to ensure balanced coverage.

        Every Jigsaw Piece (lesson) contributes to this and our mapping grids clearly indicate which elements are enhanced in each lesson. Every lesson in Jigsaw has 2 learning intentions – one of which is always social and emotional. This ensures that not only are the social and emotional aspects of learning included in every lesson, but also that children are encouraged to recognise and value their own learning in these areas.

      • Is the Jigsaw sex education controversial?

        Sex education in primary schools is recommended by the Department and CCEA as part of Personal Development through the Health Growth and Change theme in Key Stage 2.

        We do not believe our content is controversial. Many of our schools have been using the Jigsaw materials for sex education and puberty for several years confidently with the support of parents and carers. Feedback from our newer schools is positive and indicates that the content is in line with what they would expect from a high-quality PSHE resource. Our sex education content is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values.

        The ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle in Jigsaw 3-11 covers puberty and human reproduction in the context of coping positively with change. It does this in a sensitive and age-appropriate way offering schools teaching materials that meet statutory Health Education expectations as part of Personal Development.

        Schools can of course adapt this content as they feel is appropriate for their pupils in line with the statutory guidance. We also provide leaflets and a parent presentation that schools can use as part of their parental engagement on RSE.

      • Is the RSHE in Jigsaw suitable for Catholic schools?

        The RSHE that we teach in Jigsaw has two main functions: to help children enjoy successful relationships (with friends, siblings, parents, etc.) and to keep them safe, now and in the future. The Jigsaw Pieces (lessons) in the Changing Me Puzzle (unit) aim to give children their entitlement to information about puberty and human reproduction, appropriate to their age and stage of development. 
         
        It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear. We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values and there is a strong safeguarding element to the ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle (as there is throughout Jigsaw).
         
        The sex education in Jigsaw is progressive and developmental and is naturally built into the Changing Me Puzzle as part of the teaching about how our bodies change in puberty so that we are able to reproduce when we are older.
         
        The RSHE materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit appropriately with the individual philosophy and ethos of that school. Catholic schools will obviously need to check their own diocesan advice during this process.
         
        There are lots of Catholic schools using Jigsaw and some of these are implementing the Changing Me materials as they are, others have tweaked them to fit their requirements. For example, in Jigsaw we use specially-designed animations to help teach some of the elements of sex education: most schools use the animations, while some schools choose not to. It’s your choice – there is no obligation either way.
         
        We also have a mapping document for schools showing the parallels between Jigsaw’s approach and content for Relationships, Health and Sex Education with regard to “Learning to Love”. This can be used to help you compare the teaching materials with your school’s local diocese guidance.
         
      • Is Financial Education included in Jigsaw?

        Yes. There are numerous opportunities in Jigsaw for teaching and learning about financial capability and economic well-being. The Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.
         
        For the younger year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be better in the future.
         
        For older year groups, the emphasis is more on jobs and careers, and also on supporting others with fundraising, etc. For example, in Year 6, there are lessons on children’s dream jobs and the steps they need to take to get there, what people in a variety of jobs earn and how everyone makes a contribution in society. The end of Puzzle outcomes also offer opportunities for enterprise and learning about money and finance e.g. building a garden of Dreams and Goals enables children to collaborate to raise money for charity.
         
        There are also additional lesson plans dealing explicitly with money, spending, saving etc on the Jigsaw website for all our schools to use to supplement the lessons already in the Jigsaw Programme if they wish to.
      • Does Jigsaw include up-to-date content on staying safe online?

        Yes. Jigsaw starts to include specific teaching and learning about online safety in Key Stage 1 which builds on earlier learning about what makes a good friendship, how to treat others with respect and kindness and what to do if you feel unsafe and might need help. 
         
        As children progress through primary there are specific lessons on online safety, as well as discussions and scenarios built into other lessons on relationships, safety and asking for help that allow exploration of safety around online forums, games, mobile phones and social media. 
         
        These are mapped clearly to the statutory requirements as well as to the Education for a Connected World guidance from the UK Council for Internet Safety
         
      • How can we use Jigsaw 3-11 when we have composite classes made up of more than one year group?

        The whole school approach in Jigsaw means that every year group is studying the same theme at the same time e.g. ‘Celebrating Difference’ in Autumn 2.

        The same themes are revisited and built upon throughout the programme, always with content that allows the class teacher to assess pupils’ knowledge and understanding through a form of baseline assessment at the beginning of the Puzzle (unit of work) and then guide discussions and activities in response to the pupils’ needs. This makes it easier for the teacher to plan and differentiate the teaching and learning for the class they are teaching, whatever the age of the pupils in front of them.

        There are a large number of Jigsaw schools on a 2 year rolling cycle who are able to use the majority of the materials like this with only a handful of lessons needing some adaptation to ensure that the content is fully accessible for all.

        There are very few lessons within the Puzzles where children are reliant on specific knowledge from a previous year group that is not revisited in the teaching, and we can help you identify the lessons where this may take place if you feel you would like the support. These lessons are mostly related to drug education in Healthy Me and puberty and sex education in Changing Me. Some schools choose to adapt these lessons, and some choose to split the classes into smaller groups for parts of them instead.

        Some Jigsaw schools are tiny and may have 3 or 4 year groups in one composite class. These much smaller schools will find that there will be some more occasions in Key Stage 2 where they will need to split the groups into narrower age groups for at least part of the lessons due the to nature of the topics being discussed (for example in some drug education, puberty and relationships lessons), but the exact needs of each school will vary according to the mix of age groups and how each school approaches this in other curriculum areas.

      • How do I differentiate a Jigsaw lesson for my SEND children?

        The mindfulness approach that we use across each lesson allows pupils of all abilities to access the learning and the nature of the teaching and learning activities makes the learning in Jigsaw more accessible for many SEND children than some other curriculum areas.

        We also have some specific documents to further help you to support SEND children in the classroom relating to Autism, and also an alternative set of Connect Us activities for children with restricted mobility and/or limited language and communication skills.

        The Jigsaw 3-11 mapping and progression documents show how pupils develop their knowledge and understanding about the topics discussed in the classroom as well as their social and emotional learning throughout Jigsaw. This helps class teachers to identify specific areas where the teaching and learning can be adapted to suit the needs of different children, sometimes from an alternative year group’s resources.

        Alongside this, we have mapped the specific lesson planning in Jigsaw with the content that is relevant to the six sections of the PSHE Association’s Planning Framework for pupils with SEND. This enables teachers to look at ways of adapting and using specific lesson plans in progressive stages for children with SEND.

        The feedback from schools reinforces that the universal delivery of Jigsaw is successful and promotes pupil voice. This comes through the specific planned content as well as through the development of children’s confidence and skills in communication around different topics.

      • How does Jigsaw make a difference to children's mental health?

        There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw helps children learn about mental health; and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health.
         
        Jigsaw is designed to provide structured opportunities in every lesson to practise and enhance the five skills associated with the emotional literacy (self-awareness, social skills, empathy, motivation and managing feelings).
         
        Confidence in oneself and awareness of self – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes tricky concepts for children (and adults!) to adopt. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping children to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners.
         
        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness which aims to empower children to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives. It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.
         
        The practice of mindfulness, where children learn to be in the present moment without judgement, is taught in every Jigsaw lesson in 3 different ways:
         
        • The first is through the Calm Me time - through visualisation and through breathing techniques.
        • The second is through the ‘Pause Points’ in lessons where children are invited to stop and look inside to practice observing their thoughts and feelings relating to their learning in the lesson.
        • The third is through the other parts of the taught curriculum where children explore their thoughts and feelings, expand their emotional vocabulary, learn about and reflect on the thoughts/feelings/consequences sequences, build their confidence and express themselves in a safe environment.
         
        The Healthy Me Puzzle is where most of the ‘traditional’ health promotion lessons are. From the food on our plates and the importance of physical activity for a healthy body (and mind) in the earlier year groups, to the more sophisticated health messages about choice, lifestyle and mental and emotional health promotion in the older year groups, children gain a fully experiential approach to holistic health in Jigsaw – and how it is their responsibility to care for and also where they can go for help when they need support.
         
        The latest guidance recommends that schools needs to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learnt by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every year group. 
         
        A programme like Jigsaw can be so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how children learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health. Each lesson plan includes a social and emotional learning intention so that the purpose of that lesson is clear in terms of children’s emotional development, not just their ‘knowledge learning’.  
         
        Children are able to see and value this and develop the skills to self-assess their learning. Additionally, everything that schools do in Jigsaw can be linked to positive behaviour policy (which is where the Learning Charter work in Being Me in My World is so useful). More intensive intervention work with more vulnerable children is needed, to ensure that all children’s needs are met – at a universal and a targeted level.
         
        Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for pupils and staff and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values, but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.
      • How does Jigsaw contribute to teachers’ mental health?

        Jigsaw values teachers’ professional judgement and knowledge of how to best support the pupils in their classrooms. We ensure that our programme has all the content and support that a busy teacher needs to deliver high quality PSHE for all the children in the classroom, whatever the topic or political climate.

        We fully expect teachers to adapt the materials in the classroom for the pupils in front of them, but by following the programme structure and learning intentions they can be confident that they are providing a broad and balanced curriculum across the school that will help prepare children for all the different aspects of life beyond the classroom, as well as within it.

        Every teacher in a Jigsaw school has access to a Jigsaw mentor who can help to find documents, explain things that they may have questions about in connection to their class, or simply help to explain how something works when there are a hundred other things in that week they are having to contend with.

        Jigsaw also has additional optional lesson plans on specific topics that schools can use to tackle some specific subject areas that other schools may not need to address such as knife crime, railway safety and FGM. As well as these, we provide leaflets for parents, mapping documents and explanatory articles in all the areas that schools tell us that they need.

        We also ensure that we listen to teacher feedback and make changes or additions wherever we can, and tailor our webinars to meet the areas that teachers tell us that they would like support with.

      • Are the Jigsaw Assemblies important?

        Definitely! Each Jigsaw Puzzle is launched across the whole school at the same time with a specific Puzzle Launch Assembly designed to appeal to all the year groups. These assemblies initiate key learning messages that are then reinforced in the lessons and Weekly Celebrations. This helps maintain focus and intention for both children and staff.

        There is one set of Puzzle Launch Assemblies included in the Jigsaw Programme when you buy it and there are 3 additional sets of Puzzle Launch assemblies available for purchase as part of the Bumper Bundle of assemblies. This Bumper Bundle also includes x36 weekly celebration assemblies which help launch the weekly theme.

        As well as the assembly for each Puzzle, we envisage schools will also hold Celebration/Golden Assemblies that will include reference to what children have been doing in Jigsaw that week. These Weekly Celebration Assemblies can be used as part of the Jigsaw scheme or stand-alone and are available now in the Jigsaw online store.

      • Does Jigsaw fit with the Rights Respecting Schools Award?

        Jigsaw aims to empower children to understand their own rights and those of others, and supports the development of global citizenship.
        We have mapped the Jigsaw Puzzles’ contribution to the Rights Respecting Schools Award and to the Universal Convention on the Rights of the Child.

        Many schools successfully integrate the Rights Respecting Charter within the structured delivery of Jigsaw lessons.

      • How can we assess pupil’s progress in Jigsaw 3-11?

        In Pre-School and Year 1, Jigsaw identifies assessment opportunities in the lessons that are relevant to learning in PSED and is an important basis for learning as children move up through the school.

        From Year 2 onwards, there are built in assessment opportunities within every lesson, including baseline assessments for teachers to assess how to guide the discussions related to the topics and learning intentions across the whole unit of work. These are not written tests, but activities such as continuums or discussions that encourage deeper thinking and reflection.

        There are then weekly pupil self assessments in every lesson, as well as summative assessment opportunities built into the last piece of every Puzzle (unit of work). Much of the active learning content in Jigsaw is discussion based, but we encourage the use of individual Jigsaw Journals to keep a record of individual children’s formative assessment from these lessons and any written work and certificates that children receive both in and out of the lessons that are relevant to their learning in PSHE.

        These journals can move through the school with pupils for them to see their own progress, and also be used to help teachers carry out summative assessment.

      • Does Jigsaw support the Safeguarding agenda, including Sexual Harassment and Peer-on-Peer Abuse?

        The Education Scotland Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy (Aug 2020), explains how education providers should help, “children, young people and adults to be safe, nurtured, achieving, healthy, active, included, respected and responsible; and children, young people and adults in Scotland to become successful learners, confident individuals, responsible citizens and effective contributors in centres of learning, the workplace and the community”.

        Put simply, Jigsaw helps to teach children about keeping themselves safe and promotes an ethos in school that strongly supports keeping children safe in many diverse situations.

        From the Early Years onwards, children are taught about what to say and do if they don’t like something – from encountering strangers to bullying, from unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology.

        As ever, the emphasis is on helping children realise their independence and responsibility for themselves, rather than employing scare tactics and horror stories to frighten children and dissuade them from choosing certain paths.

        This content reflects the most up-to-date guidance around teaching about peer-on-peer abuse and harassment in an age-appropriate way, and we provide clear supporting materials for schools that shows when and how this is taught.

      • Does Jigsaw support the prevention of extremism and radicalisation agenda?

        Jigsaw does not cover radicalisation and extremist behaviour explicitly, as the concepts themselves are perhaps not appropriate for teaching about in primary schools: whilst we want to prepare children for life, at the same time we do not want to alarm them.

        Rather, Jigsaw makes a significant contribution towards ensuring that the curriculum and the learning environment that children experience lays down a grounding in which the ideological and emotional roots of extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours cannot flourish.

        This contribution emerges first and foremost through the overall character of the Jigsaw scheme and the learning styles it advocates, but also through many aspects of the specific content of the themes or ‘Puzzles’ that make up the programme.

        Children are taught to know their own minds, to operate from a position of self-awareness and self-valuing, and to develop the capacity to empathise with others.

        Children develop the skills and confidence in Jigsaw to have respectful discussions around sensitive subjects, and in upper KS2 this includes lessons around topics such as belonging, peer pressure, changing relationships and gangs, which can be built upon in more specific lessons when they reach secondary school.

      • Does Jigsaw have lessons on issues like bullying, racism and equality?

        Our Celebrating Difference Puzzle in the Autumn term truly looks at the diversity in our local and wider communities and the benefits that this brings to us all.

        Within this, there are also lessons looking at what bullying is, why it happens, and how we can all behave in a way that supports each other, including the pros and cons of peer influence, how to say no, where to go for help and how to support others.

        We do not have lessons that single out just one particular group in a lesson such as race, sexuality, disability or gender but these aspects are reflected in the lessons in an age appropriate way with lessons explaining the importance of the Equality Act and Protected Characteristics in Upper Primary, when we find pupils are also naturally bringing more questions on these areas to the classroom.

        Jigsaw lessons provide a safe supported environment for having respectful discussions about topics that some adults find difficult to discuss, and we ensure that our planning supports teachers to manage these in a respectful and non-political manner including the use of the Jigsaw charter, the lesson structure and distancing techniques.

      • How does Jigsaw contribute to SHANARRI?

        Jigsaw Scotland, the mindful approach to Health and Wellbeing, brings together Personal, Social, Health and Economic education in a comprehensive, structured scheme of work to fulfil the requirements of the Health and Wellbeing Curriculum’s Experiences and Outcomes and SHANARRI.

        There is a strong emphasis on emotional literacy and nurturing mental health as the necessary underpinnings for learning with a unique mindfulness approach in every lesson.

        Jigsaw Scotland provides detailed lesson plans providing practitioners with everything they need to deliver creative teaching and learning activities.

      • Will Jigsaw help us with SMSC?

        At Jigsaw we highly value these aspects of children’s development and believe that Jigsaw enhances each of them. We have mapped SMSC across each Puzzle and across each year group to ensure balanced coverage.

        Every Jigsaw Piece (lesson) contributes to this target and our mapping grids clearly indicate which elements are enhanced in each lesson. Every lesson in Jigsaw has 2 learning intentions – one of which is always social and emotional.

        This ensures that not only are the social and emotional aspects of learning included in every lesson, but also that children are encouraged to recognise and value their own learning in these areas.

      • Is the Jigsaw sex education controversial?

        We do not believe our content is controversial. Many of our schools have been using the Jigsaw materials for sex education and puberty for several years confidently with the support of parents and carers.

        Feedback from our newer schools is positive and indicates that the content is in line with what they would expect from a high quality PSHE resource. Our sex education content is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values.

        The ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle in Jigsaw 3-11 covers puberty and human reproduction in the context of coping positively with change. It does this in a sensitive and age-appropriate way which includes lessons on human reproduction, the coverage of which is at schools’ discretion.

        We also provide leaflets and a parent presentation that schools can use as part of their parental engagement on RSE.

      • Is the RSHE in Jigsaw suitable for Catholic schools?

        The RSHE that we teach in Jigsaw has two main functions: to help children enjoy successful relationships (with friends, siblings, parents, etc.) and to keep them safe, now and in the future.

        The Jigsaw Pieces (lessons) in the Changing Me Puzzle (unit) aim to give children their entitlement to information about puberty and human reproduction, appropriate to their age and stage of development. It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear.

        We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values and there is a strong safeguarding element to the ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle (as there is throughout Jigsaw).

        The sex education in Jigsaw is progressive and developmental and is naturally built into the Changing Me Puzzle as part of the teaching about how our bodies change in puberty so that we are able to reproduce when we are older.

        The RSHE materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit appropriately with the individual philosophy and ethos of that school. Catholic schools will obviously need to check their own diocesan advice during this process.

        There are lots of Catholic schools using Jigsaw and some of these are implementing the Changing Me materials as they are, others have tweaked them to fit their requirements. For example, in Jigsaw we use specially-designed animations to help teach some of the elements of sex education: most schools use the animations, while some schools choose not to. It’s your choice – there is no obligation either way.

        We also have a mapping document for schools showing the parallels between Jigsaw’s approach and content for Relationships, Health and Sex Education with regard to “Learning to Love” . This can be used to help you compare the teaching materials with your school’s local diocese guidance.
      • Is Financial Education included in Jigsaw?

        Yes. There are numerous opportunities in Jigsaw for teaching and learning about financial capability and economic well-being. The Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

        For the younger year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be better in the future.

        For older year groups, the emphasis is more on jobs and careers, and also on supporting others with fundraising, etc. For example, in Year 5, there are lessons on children’s dream jobs and the steps they need to take to get there, what people in a variety of jobs earn and how everyone makes a contribution in society.

        The end of Puzzle outcomes also offer opportunities for enterprise and learning about money and finance e.g. building a garden of Dreams and Goals enables children to collaborate to raise money for charity.

        There are also additional lesson plans dealing explicitly with money, spending, saving etc on the Jigsaw website for all our schools to use to supplement the lessons already in the Jigsaw Programme if they wish to.

      • Does Jigsaw include up-to-date content on staying safe online?

        Yes. Jigsaw starts to include teaching and learning about online safety from P2 which builds on earlier learning about what makes a good friendship, how to treat others with respect and kindness and what to do if you feel unsafe and might need help. 
         
        As children progress through primary there are specific lessons on online safety, as well as discussions and scenarios built into other lessons on relationships, safety and asking for help that allow exploration of safety around online forums, games, mobile phones and social media. 
         
        These are mapped clearly to the statutory requirements as well as to the Education for a Connected World guidance.
         
      • How can we use Jigsaw 3-11 when we have composite classes made up of more than one year group?

        The whole school approach in Jigsaw means that every year group is studying the same theme at the same time e.g. ‘Celebrating Difference’ in Autumn 2.

        The same themes are revisited and built upon throughout the programme, always with content that allows the class teacher to assess pupils’ knowledge and understanding through a form of baseline assessment at the beginning of the Puzzle (unit of work) and then guide discussions and activities in response to the pupils’ needs.

        This makes it easier for the teacher to plan and differentiate the teaching and learning for the class they are teaching, whatever the age of the pupils in front of them.

        There are a large number of Jigsaw schools on a 2-year rolling cycle who are able to use the majority of the materials like this with only a handful of lessons needing some adaptation to ensure that the content is fully accessible for all.

        There are very few lessons within the Puzzles where children are reliant on specific knowledge from a previous year group that is not revisited in the teaching, and we can help you identify the lessons where this may take place if you feel you would like the support.

        These lessons are mostly related to drug education in Healthy Me and puberty and sex education in Changing Me. Some schools choose to adapt these lessons, and some choose to split the classes into smaller groups for parts of them instead

        Some Jigsaw schools are tiny and may have 3 or 4 year groups in one composite class. These much smaller schools will find that there will be some more occasions in Key Stage 2 where they will need to split the groups into narrower age groups for at least part of the lessons due the to nature of the topics being discussed (for example in some drug education, puberty and relationships lessons), but the exact needs of each school will vary according to the mix of age groups and how each school approaches this in other curriculum areas.

      • How do I differentiate a Jigsaw lesson for my SEND children?

        The mindfulness approach that we use across each lesson allows pupils of all abilities to access the learning and the nature of the teaching and learning activities makes the learning in Jigsaw more accessible for many SEND children than some other curriculum areas.

        We also have some specific documents to further help you to support SEND children in the classroom relating to Autism, and also an alternative set of Connect Us activities for children with restricted mobility and/or limited language and communication skills.

        The Jigsaw 3-12 mapping and progression documents show how pupils develop their knowledge and understanding about the topics discussed in the classroom as well as their social and emotional learning throughout Jigsaw.

        This helps class teachers to identify specific areas where the teaching and learning can be adapted to suit the needs of different children, sometimes from an alternative year group’s resources.

        Alongside this, we have mapped the specific lesson planning in Jigsaw with the content that is relevant to the six sections of the PSHE Association’s Planning Framework for pupils with SEND.

        The feedback from schools reinforces that the universal delivery of Jigsaw is successful and promotes pupil voice. This comes through the specific planned content as well as through the development of children’s confidence and skills in communication around different topics.

      • How does Jigsaw make a difference to children's mental health?

        There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw helps children learn about mental health; and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health.
         
        Jigsaw is designed to provide structured opportunities in every lesson to practise and enhance the five skills associated with the emotional literacy (self-awareness, social skills, empathy, motivation and managing feelings).
         
        Confidence in oneself and awareness of self – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes tricky concepts for children (and adults!) to adopt. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping children to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners.
         
        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness which aims to empower children to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives. It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.
         
        The practice of mindfulness, where children learn to be in the present moment without judgement, is taught in every Jigsaw lesson in 3 different ways:
         
        • The first is through the Calm Me time - through visualisation and through breathing techniques.
        • The second is through the ‘Pause Points’ in lessons where children are invited to stop and look inside to practice observing their thoughts and feelings relating to their learning in the lesson.
        • The third is through the other parts of the taught curriculum where children explore their thoughts and feelings, expand their emotional vocabulary, learn about and reflect on the thoughts/feelings/consequences sequences, build their confidence and express themselves in a safe environment.
         
        The Healthy Me Puzzle is where most of the ‘traditional’ health promotion lessons are. From the food on our plates and the importance of physical activity for a healthy body (and mind) in the earlier year groups, to the more sophisticated health messages about choice, lifestyle and mental and emotional health promotion in the older year groups, children gain a fully experiential approach to holistic health in Jigsaw – and how it is their responsibility to care for and also where they can go for help when they need support.
         
        The latest guidance recommends that schools needs to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learnt by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every year group. 
         
        A programme like Jigsaw can be so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how children learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health. Each lesson plan includes a social and emotional learning intention so that the purpose of that lesson is clear in terms of children’s emotional development, not just their ‘knowledge learning’.  
         
        Children are able to see and value this and develop the skills to self-assess their learning. Additionally, everything that schools do in Jigsaw can be linked to positive behaviour policy (which is where the Learning Charter work in Being Me in My World is so useful). More intensive intervention work with more vulnerable children is needed, to ensure that all children’s needs are met – at a universal and a targeted level.
         
        Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for pupils and staff and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values, but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.
      • How does Jigsaw contribute to teachers’ mental health?

        Jigsaw values teachers’ professional judgement and knowledge of how to best support the pupils in their classrooms. We ensure that our programme has all the content and support that a busy teacher needs to deliver high quality PSHE for all the children in the classroom, whatever the topic or political climate.

        We fully expect teachers to adapt the materials in the classroom for the pupils in front of them, but by following the programme structure and learning intentions they can be confident that they are providing a broad and balanced curriculum across the school that will help prepare children for all the different aspects of life beyond the classroom, as well as within it.

        Every teacher in a Jigsaw school has access to a Jigsaw mentor who can help to find documents, explain things that they may have questions about in connection to their class, or simply help to explain how something works when there are a hundred other things in that week they are having to contend with.

        Jigsaw also has additional optional lesson plans on specific topics that schools can use to tackle some specific subject areas that other schools may not need to address such as knife crime, railway safety and FGM.

        As well as these, we provide leaflets for parents, mapping documents and explanatory articles in all the areas that schools tell us that they need.
        We also ensure that we listen to teacher feedback and make changes or additions wherever we can, and tailor our webinars to meet the areas that teachers tell us that they would like support with.

      • Are the Jigsaw Assemblies important?

        Definitely! Each Jigsaw Puzzle is launched across the whole school at the same time with a specific Puzzle Launch Assembly designed to appeal to all the year groups. These assemblies initiate key learning messages that are then reinforced in the lessons and Weekly Celebrations. This helps maintain focus and intention for both children and staff.

        There is one set of Puzzle Launch Assemblies included in the Jigsaw Programme when you buy it and there are 3 additional sets of Puzzle Launch assemblies available for purchase as part of the Bumper Bundle of assemblies. This Bumper Bundle also includes x36 weekly celebration assemblies which help launch the weekly theme.

        As well as the assembly for each Puzzle, we envisage schools will also hold Celebration/Golden Assemblies that will include references to what children have been doing in Jigsaw that week. These Weekly Celebration Assemblies can be used as part of the Jigsaw scheme or stand-alone and are available now in the Jigsaw online store.

      • Does Jigsaw fit with the Rights Respecting Schools Award?

        Jigsaw aims to empower children to understand their own rights and those of others, and supports the development of global citizenship.
        We have mapped the Jigsaw Puzzles’ contribution to the Rights Respecting Schools Award and to the Universal Convention on the Rights of the Child.

        Many schools successfully integrate the Rights Respecting Charter within the structured delivery of Jigsaw lessons.

      • How can we assess pupil’s progress in Jigsaw 3-11?

        In the Early Years, Jigsaw identifies assessment opportunities in the lessons.

        From ages 5-12 years, there are built-in assessment opportunities within every lesson, including baseline assessments for teachers to assess how to guide the discussions related to the topics and learning intentions across the whole unit of work.

        These are not written tests, but activities such as continuums or discussions that encourage deeper thinking and reflection. There are then weekly pupil self-assessments in every lesson, as well as summative assessment opportunities built into the last piece of every Puzzle (unit of work).

        Much of the active learning content in Jigsaw is discussion-based, but we encourage the use of individual Jigsaw Journals to keep a record of individual children’s formative assessment from these lessons and any written work and certificates that children receive both in and out of the lessons that are relevant to their learning in PSHE.

        These journals can move through the school with pupils for them to see their own progress, and also be used to help teachers carry out summative assessments.

      • Does Jigsaw support the Safeguarding agenda?

        Recent guidance from the Welsh Government in partnership with the NSCC and Barnardo’s on sexual harassment and Peer-on Peer abuse, to be read alongside other existing broader guidance on safeguarding, stressed the need for schools to take a whole school approach to safeguarding and said that;
        “Respectful relationships, well-being and safeguarding should be at the heart of education settings’ ethos”.
         
        Put simply, Jigsaw helps to teach children about keeping themselves safe and promotes an ethos in school that strongly supports keeping children safe in many diverse situations.
         
        From the Early Years onwards, children are taught about what to say and do if they don’t like something – from encountering strangers to bullying, and from unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology. 
         
        As ever, the emphasis is on helping children realise their independence and responsibility for themselves, rather than employing scare tactics and horror stories to frighten children and dissuade them from choosing certain paths.
         
        Jigsaw 11-16 for Secondary also builds on content from the primary phases, extending knowledge and confidence on where to go for help support with signposting opportunities at the end of every lesson.
         
        This content reflects the most up-to-date guidance around teaching about peer-on-peer abuse and harassment in an age-appropriate way, and we provide clear supporting materials for schools that shows when and how this is taught.
      • Can we have Jigsaw 3-11 in Welsh?

        Yes – soon! We are currently well into the process of preparing all of our 3-11 teaching resources in Welsh for our Welsh Jigsaw Schools. Our new Mapping documents to the 2022 RSE Guidance is available in Welsh or English.

      • Does Jigsaw support the prevention of extremism and radicalisation agenda?

        Jigsaw does not cover radicalisation and extremist behaviour explicitly, as the concepts themselves are perhaps not appropriate for teaching about in primary schools: whilst we want to prepare children for life, at the same time we do not want to alarm them.

        Rather, Jigsaw makes a significant contribution towards ensuring that the curriculum and the learning environment that children experience lays down a grounding in which the ideological and emotional roots of extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours cannot flourish.

        This contribution emerges first and foremost through the overall character of the Jigsaw scheme and the learning styles it advocates, but also through many aspects of the specific content of the themes or ‘Puzzles’ that make up the programme.

        Children are taught to know their own minds, to operate from a position of self-awareness and self-valuing, and to develop the capacity to empathise with others.

        Children develop the skills and confidence in Jigsaw to have respectful discussions around sensitive subjects, and towards the end of Phase 2 this includes lessons around topics such as belonging, peer pressure, changing relationships and gangs, which can be built upon in more specific lessons when they reach secondary school.

      • Is the Jigsaw sex education controversial?

        We do not believe our content is controversial. Many of our schools have been using the Jigsaw materials for sex education and puberty confidently before it became statutory for several years with the support of parents and carers.

        Feedback from our newer schools is also positive and indicates that the content is in line with what they would expect from a high quality PSHE resource. Our sex education content is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values.

        The ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle in Jigsaw 3-11 covers puberty and human reproduction in the context of coping positively with change. It does this in a sensitive and age-appropriate way offering schools teaching materials that meet statutory RSE expectations, and is clearly presented and mapped in a way that allows schools to adapt this where they feel it needs to be for their school community.

        We also provide leaflets and a parent presentation that schools can use as part of their parental engagement on RSE.

      • Is the RSHE in Jigsaw suitable for Catholic schools?

        The RSHE that we teach in Jigsaw has two main functions: to help children enjoy successful relationships (with friends, siblings, parents, etc.) and to keep them safe, now and in the future. The Jigsaw Pieces (lessons) in the Changing Me Puzzle (unit) aim to give children their entitlement to information about puberty and human reproduction, appropriate to their age and stage of development.
         
        It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear. We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values and there is a strong safeguarding element to the ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle (as there is throughout Jigsaw).
         
        The sex education in Jigsaw is progressive and developmental and is naturally built into the Changing Me Puzzle as part of the teaching about how our bodies change in puberty so that we are able to reproduce when we are older.
        The materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit appropriately with the individual philosophy and ethos of that school. Catholic schools will obviously need to check their own diocesan advice during this process.
         
        There are lots of Catholic schools using Jigsaw and some of these are implementing the Changing Me materials as they are, others have tweaked them to fit their requirements. For example, in Jigsaw we use specially-designed animations to help teach some of the elements of sex education: most schools use the animations, while some schools choose not to. It’s your choice – there is no obligation either way.
         
        We also have a mapping document for schools showing the parallels between Jigsaw’s approach and content for Relationships, Health and Sex Education with regard to “Learning to Love”, based on guidance form the Diocese of Liverpool. This can be used to help you compare the teaching materials with your school’s local diocese guidance.
      • Is Financial Education included in Jigsaw?

        Yes. There are numerous opportunities in Jigsaw for teaching and learning about financial capability and economic well-being. The Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

        For the younger year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be better in the future.

        For older year groups, the emphasis is more on jobs and careers, and also on supporting others with fundraising, etc. For example, in Year 5, there are lessons on children’s dream jobs and the steps they need to take to get there, what people in a variety of jobs earn and how everyone makes a contribution in society.

        The end of Puzzle outcomes also offer opportunities for enterprise and learning about money and finance e.g. building a garden of Dreams and Goals enables children to collaborate to raise money for charity.

        There are also additional lesson plans dealing explicitly with money, spending, saving etc on the Jigsaw website for all our schools to use to supplement the lessons already in the Jigsaw Programme if they wish to.

      • How can we use Jigsaw 3-11 when we have composite classes made up of more than one year group?

        The whole school approach in Jigsaw means that every year group is studying the same theme at the same time e.g. ‘Celebrating Difference’ in Autumn 2. The same themes are revisited and built upon throughout the programme, always with content that allows the class teacher to assess pupils’ knowledge and understanding through a form of baseline assessment at the beginning of the Puzzle (unit of work) and then guide discussions and activities in response to the pupils’ needs.

        This makes it easier for the teacher to plan and differentiate the teaching and learning for the class they are teaching, whatever the age of the pupils in front of them.

        There are a large number of Jigsaw schools on a 2 year rolling cycle who are able to use the majority of the materials like this with only a handful of lessons needing some adaptation to ensure that the content is fully accessible for all.

        There are very few lessons within the Puzzles where children are reliant on specific knowledge from a previous year group that is not revisited in the teaching, and we can help you identify the lessons where this may take place if you feel you would like the support.

        These lessons are mostly related to drug education in Healthy Me and puberty and sex education in Changing Me. Some schools choose to adapt these lessons, and some choose to split the classes into smaller groups for parts of them instead.

        Some Jigsaw schools are tiny and may have 3 or 4 year groups in one composite class. These much smaller schools will find that there will be some more occasions in Key Stage 2 where they will need to split the groups into narrower age groups for at least part of the lessons due the to nature of the topics being discussed (for example in some drug education, puberty and relationships lessons), but the exact needs of each school will vary according to the mix of age groups and how each school approaches this in other curriculum areas.

      • How do I differentiate a Jigsaw lesson for my SEND children?

        The mindfulness approach that we use across each lesson allows pupils of all abilities to access the learning and the nature of the teaching and learning activities makes the learning in Jigsaw more accessible for many SEND children than some other curriculum areas.

        We also have some specific documents to further help you to support SEND children in the classroom relating to Autism, and also an alternative set of Connect Us activities for children with restricted mobility and/or limited language and communication skills.

        The Jigsaw 3-11 mapping and progression documents show how pupils develop their knowledge and understanding about the topics discussed in the classroom as well as their social and emotional learning throughout Jigsaw. This helps class teachers to identify specific areas where the teaching and learning can be adapted to suit the needs of different children, sometimes from an alternative year group’s resources.

        Alongside this, we have mapped the specific lesson planning in Jigsaw with the content that is relevant to the six sections of the PSHE Associations Planning Framework for pupils with SEND. Although this is a document designed primarily for schools in England, it demonstrates key areas where practitioners can adapt resources for different aspects of learning in Jigsaw.

        The feedback from schools reinforces that the universal delivery of Jigsaw is successful and promotes pupil voice.

      • Does Jigsaw have lessons on issues like bullying, racism and Protected Characteristics?

        Our Celebrating Difference Puzzle in the Autumn term truly looks at the diversity in our local and wider communities and the benefits that this brings to us all. Within this, there are also lessons looking at what bullying is, why it happens, and how we can all behave in a way that supports each other, including the pros and cons of peer influence, how to say no, where to go for help and how to support others.

        We do not have lessons that single out just one particular group in a lesson such as race, sexuality, disability or gender but these aspects are reflected in the lessons in an age-appropriate way with lessons explaining the importance of the Equality Act and Protected Characteristics in Upper Key Stage 2, when we find pupils are also naturally bringing more questions on these areas to the classroom.

        Jigsaw lessons provide a safe supported environment for having respectful discussions about topics that some adults find difficult to discuss, and we ensure that our planning supports teachers to manage these in a respectful and non-political manner including the use of the Jigsaw charter, the lesson structure and distancing techniques.

      • How does Jigsaw contribute to children's mental health?

        There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw helps children learn about mental health, and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health.
         
        Jigsaw is designed to provide structured opportunities in every lesson to practise and enhance the five skills associated with emotional literacy (self-awareness, social skills, empathy, motivation and managing feelings).
         
        Confidence in oneself and awareness of self – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes tricky concepts for children (and adults!) to adopt. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping children to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners.
         
        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness which aims to empower children to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives. It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.
         
        The practice of mindfulness, where children learn to be in the present moment without judgement, is taught in every Jigsaw lesson in 3 different ways:
        • The first is through the Calm Me time - through visualisation and through breathing techniques.
        • The second is through the ‘Pause Points’ in lessons where children are invited to stop and look inside to practice observing their thoughts and feelings relating to their learning in the lesson.
        • The third is through the other parts of the taught curriculum where children explore their thoughts and feelings, expand their emotional vocabulary, learn about and reflect on the thoughts/feelings/consequences sequences, build their confidence and express themselves in a safe environment.
        The Healthy Me Puzzle is where most of the ‘traditional’ health promotion lessons are. From the food on our plates and the importance of physical activity for a healthy body (and mind) in the earlier year groups, to the more sophisticated health messages about choice, lifestyle and mental and emotional health promotion in the older year groups, children gain a fully experiential approach to holistic health in Jigsaw – and how it is their responsibility to care for and also where they can go for help when they need support.
         
        The latest guidance recommends that schools needs to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learnt by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every year group.
         
        A programme like Jigsaw can be so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how children learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health. Each lesson plan includes a social and emotional learning intention so that the purpose of that lesson is clear in terms of children’s emotional development, not just their ‘knowledge learning’.
         
        Children can see and value this and develop the skills to self-assess their learning. Additionally, everything that schools do in Jigsaw can be linked to positive behaviour policy (which is where the Learning Charter work in Being Me in My World is so useful). More intensive intervention work with more vulnerable children is needed, to ensure that all children’s needs are met – at a universal and a targeted level.
         
        Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for pupils and staff and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.
      • Are the Jigsaw Assemblies important?

        Definitely! Each Jigsaw Puzzle is launched across the whole school at the same time with a specific Puzzle Launch Assembly designed to appeal to all the year groups. These assemblies initiate key learning messages that are then reinforced in the lessons and Weekly Celebrations. This helps maintain focus and intention for both children and staff.

        There is one set of Puzzle Launch Assemblies included in the Jigsaw Programme when you buy it and there are 3 additional sets of Puzzle Launch assemblies available for purchase as part of the Bumper Bundle of assemblies. This Bumper Bundle also includes x36 weekly celebration assemblies which help launch the weekly theme.

        As well as the assembly for each Puzzle, we envisage schools will also hold Celebration/Golden Assemblies that will include reference to what children have been doing in Jigsaw that week. These Weekly Celebration Assemblies can be used as part of the Jigsaw scheme or stand-alone and are available now in the Jigsaw online store.

      • How does Jigsaw contribute to teachers’ mental health?

        Jigsaw values teachers’ professional judgement and knowledge of how to best support the pupils in their classrooms. We ensure that our programme has all the content and support that a busy teacher needs to deliver high quality PSHE for all the children in the classroom, whatever the topic or political climate.

        We fully expect teachers to adapt the materials in the classroom for the pupils in front of them, but by following the programme structure and learning intentions they can be confident that they are providing a broad and balanced curriculum across the school that will help prepare children for all the different aspects of life beyond the classroom, as well as within it.

        Every teacher in a Jigsaw school has access to a Jigsaw mentor who can help to find documents, explain things that they may have questions about in connection to their class, or simply help to explain how something works when there are a hundred other things in that week they are having to contend with.

        Jigsaw also has additional optional lesson plans on specific topics that schools can use to tackle some specific subject areas that other schools may not need to address such as knife crime, railway safety and FGM.

        As well as these, we provide leaflets for parents, mapping documents and explanatory articles in all the areas that schools tell us that they need.
        We also ensure that we listen to teacher feedback and make changes or additions wherever we can, and tailor our webinars to meet the areas that teachers tell us that they would like support with.

      • How can we assess pupil’s progress in Jigsaw 3-11?

        In Jigsaw 3-11 there are built in assessment opportunities within every lesson, including baseline assessments for teachers to assess how to guide the discussions related to the topics and learning intentions across the whole unit of work. 
         
        These are not written tests, but activities such as continuums or discussions that encourage deeper thinking and reflection. There are then weekly pupil self assessments in every lesson, as well as summative assessment opportunities built into the last piece of every Puzzle (unit of work). 
         
        Much of the active learning content in Jigsaw is discussion based, but we encourage the use of individual Jigsaw Journals to keep a record of individual children’s formative assessment from these lessons and any written work and certificates that children receive both in and out of the lessons that are relevant to their learning in PSHE. 
         
        These journals can move through the school with pupils for them to see their own progress, and also be used to help teachers carry out summative assessment.
      • Are there opportunities for Outdoor Learning in Jigsaw?

        Yes! These are built into every lesson plan for Ages 3-4yrs, and 4-5 years and then there are additional planning ideas for every lesson in Year 1 and Year 2 as well.
    • Common Ordering Questions

      • How do I order Jigsaw?

        Simply complete your online order using our Online Store on the website, send an email or give us a call and we can take your order over the phone.

      • What is the delivery time for Jigsaw?

        You will usually have the physical Jigsaw materials (Jigsaw friends, Jerrie Cats and Chimes) within 5 working days of placing your order.
         
        Your login access to electronic materials will be delivered separately by email to the person you nominated as the contact when you placed your order.
      • How do I order Jigsaw?

        Simply complete your online order using our Online Store on the website, send an email or give us a call and we can take your order over the phone.

      • How do I order Jigsaw?

        Simply complete your online order using our Online Store on the website, send an email or give us a call and we can take your order over the phone.

      • What is the delivery time for Jigsaw?

        You will usually have the physical Jigsaw materials (Jigsaw friends, Jerrie Cats and Chimes) within 5 working days of placing your order.

        Your login access to electronic materials will be delivered separately by email to the person you nominated as the contact when you placed your order.

      • How do I order Jigsaw?

        Simply complete your online order using our Online Store on the website, send an email or give us a call and we can take your order over the phone.

      • What is the delivery time for Jigsaw?

        You will usually have the physical Jigsaw materials (Jigsaw friends, Jerrie Cats and Chimes) within 5 working days of placing your order.

        Your login access to electronic materials will be delivered separately by email to the person you nominated as the contact when you placed your order.

      • How do I order Jigsaw?

        Simply complete your online order using our Online Store on the website, send an email or give us a call and we can take your order over the phone.

      • What is the delivery time for Jigsaw?

        You will usually have the physical Jigsaw materials (Jigsaw friends, Jerrie Cats and Chimes) within 5 working days of placing your order.

        Your login access to electronic materials will be delivered separately by email to the person you nominated as the contact when you placed your order.

    • Common Training Questions

      • Can you come and train my whole staff on how to use Jigsaw?

        The Jigsaw Team offers both introductory training and/or training specific to certain aspects of Jigsaw such as PSHE, Health & Well-being, Relationships, Sex and Health Education (RSHE), or training bespoke to the needs of your school, staff, parents/carers and children.

        This is primarily available as online training, but may be possible face-to-face depending on the availability of our Jigsaw consultants.

        Primary schools can also access the Optimise Training Library (a library of 30+ recorded training sessions) as part of their annual membership.

        Please contact us with your specific requirements.

      • Can you come and train my whole staff on how to use Jigsaw?

        The Jigsaw Team offers both introductory training and/or training specific to certain aspects of Jigsaw such as PSHE, Health & Well-being, Relationships, Sex and Health Education (RSHE), or training bespoke to the needs of your school, staff, parents/carers and children.

        This is primarily available as online training, but may be possible face-to-face depending on the availability of our Jigsaw consultants.

        Primary schools can also access the Optimise Training Library (a library of 30+ recorded training sessions) as part of their annual membership.

        Please contact us with your specific requirements.

      • Can you come and train my whole staff on how to use Jigsaw?

        The Jigsaw Team offers both introductory training and/or training specific to certain aspects of Jigsaw such as PSHE, Health & Well-being, Relationships, Sex and Health Education (RSHE), or training bespoke to the needs of your school, staff, parents/carers and children.

        This is primarily available as online training, but may be possible face-to-face depending on the availability of our Jigsaw consultants.

        Primary schools can also access the Optimise Training Library (a library of 30+ recorded training sessions) as part of their annual membership.

        Please contact us with your specific requirements.

      • Can you come and train my whole staff on how to use Jigsaw?

        The Jigsaw Team offers both introductory training and/or training specific to certain aspects of Jigsaw such as PSHE, Health & Well-being, Relationships, Sex and Health Education (RSHE), or training bespoke to the needs of your school, staff, parents/carers and children.

        This is primarily available as online training, but may be possible face-to-face depending on the availability of our Jigsaw consultants.

        Primary schools can also access the Optimise Training Library (a library of 30+ recorded training sessions) as part of their annual membership.

        Please contact us with your specific requirements.

      • Can you come and train my whole staff on how to use Jigsaw?

        The Jigsaw Team offers both introductory training and/or training specific to certain aspects of Jigsaw such as PSHE, Health & Well-being, Relationships, Sex and Health Education (RSHE), or training bespoke to the needs of your school, staff, parents/carers and children.

        This is primarily available as online training, but may be possible face-to-face depending on the availability of our Jigsaw consultants.

        Primary schools can also access the Optimise Training Library (a library of 30+ recorded training sessions) as part of their annual membership.

        Please contact us with your specific requirements.

    • Common Set-Up Questions

      • How much curriculum time is needed to teach Jigsaw lessons?

        In Key Stage 1 we would expect at least 45 minutes to be allocated for a Jigsaw lesson.

        In Key Stage 2 this increases to 1 hour per lesson.

        It is possible to deliver the ‘Connect Us’ activity as a separate entity.
        Schools that commit to a regular weekly slot find that Jigsaw PSHE will have a full and positive impact on learning behaviours and school ethos.

        The PSHE curriculum quickly becomes embedded and illustrates that the school is a positive learning community; fulfilling the new inspection foci of Ofsted.

      • Do we need a Jigsaw Friend for each class?

        The Jigsaw Friend is integral to this system of learning. It acts as the talking object in the Jigsaw circle and can take on the role of a distancing tool, helping children talk about sensitive issues; and so the children will develop a positive relationship with their Jigsaw Friend.

        Therefore, it is really important that each class has its own Jigsaw Friend. The Friends need to be respected and treated as special in order to obtain the most impact.

        We do not sell Jigsaw Friends to anyone other than schools using Jigsaw in order to keep their fidelity and specialness for children.

      • Do I have to use the Jigsaw Chime or can I use another instrument?

        The Jigsaw Chimes have been specially selected for their pitch and duration of resonance. This helps children to focus for longer when listening to them. The sound helps draw a line between whatever they were previously thinking about and the focus of the ‘Calm Me’ time.

        So, we strongly recommend the Jigsaw chimes are used instead of any other instrument. Schools report that the Jigsaw Chimes really work, playing a key element in the delivery of the programme.

      • How do I use the Jigsaw Chime with a hearing-impaired child?

        The resonance of the Jigsaw Chime may bother a hearing-impaired child (with hearing aids). We recommend teachers to encourage the child to sit close to the chime with their fingers on the table next to the chime. They will then feel the resonance in their bodies.

      • Will I still need to buy lots of resources if I use Jigsaw?

        We listen to teachers and we are aware of limited budgets. Jigsaw has been created as a stand-alone resource so you will not need to buy any resources other than consumable art and craft supplies e.g. paper and crayons.

        Every lesson plan includes links to the resources needed to deliver it including the slides, Calm Me script, pictures etc. Jigsaw is a stand-alone resource needing no further outlay in Key Stages 1 and 2.

        There are suggested picture books that schools can buy to support the programme, but these are optional, particularly at Key Stages 1 and 2.
        The suggested picture books are more integral to teaching in Reception and Nursery, but many schools find they already have many of these titles, or have their own favourites on the same themes they can use instead.

        Teachers are free to enhance our resource, and as they become more confident with the programme, we encourage them to take greater ownership over the content.

        Our growing Twitter feed often illustrates good ideas and lesson successes. We also encourage schools to formally share their success stories on our website. When you become a Jigsaw school, you instantly become part of a growing and vibrant world-wide family of schools.

      • Can my TA teach Jigsaw In PPA time?

        TAs and HLTAs can teach Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE. The lesson plans are detailed and all the resources are included. However, we strongly recommend that teachers deliver Jigsaw as this programme provides on-going opportunities to get to know and build a strong relationship with the children. It also enables teachers to use the strategies in Jigsaw across the curriculum.

      • Do you offer inspection copies of Jigsaw?

        We offer our FREE Overview of Jigsaw PSHE teaching resources and product videos. To access this overview, you can request it here.

      • How much curriculum time is needed to teach Jigsaw lessons?

        In the Early Years up to Ages 6-7 years, we would expect at least 45 minutes to be allocated for a Jigsaw lesson.

        For Ages 7-8 years, this increases to 1 hour per lesson.

        It is possible to deliver the ‘Connect Us’ activity as a separate entity.

        Schools that commit to a regular weekly slot find that Jigsaw PSHE will have a full and positive impact on learning behaviours and school ethos. The PSHE curriculum quickly becomes embedded and helps to develop the school as a positive learning community.

      • How much curriculum time is needed to teach Jigsaw lessons?

        In Key Stage 1 we would expect at least 45 minutes to be allocated for a Jigsaw lesson.

        In Key Stage 2 this increases to 1 hour per lesson.

        It is possible to deliver the ‘Connect Us’ activity as a separate entity.
        Schools that commit to a regular weekly slot find that Jigsaw PSHE will have a full and positive impact on learning behaviours and school ethos.

        The PSHE curriculum quickly becomes embedded and illustrates that the school is a positive learning community; fulfilling the new inspection foci of Ofsted.

      • Do we need a Jigsaw Friend for each class?

        The Jigsaw Friend is integral to this system of learning. It acts as the talking object in the Jigsaw circle and can take on the role of a distancing tool, helping children talk about sensitive issues; and so the children will develop a positive relationship with their Jigsaw Friend.

        Therefore, it is really important that each class has its own Jigsaw Friend. The Friends need to be respected and treated as special in order to obtain the most impact.

        We do not sell Jigsaw Friends to anyone other than schools using Jigsaw in order to keep their fidelity and specialness for children.

      • Do I have to use the Jigsaw Chime or can I use another instrument?

        The Jigsaw Chimes have been specially selected for their pitch and duration of resonance. This helps children to focus for longer when listening to them. The sound helps draw a line between whatever they were previously thinking about and the focus of the ‘Calm Me’ time.

        So, we strongly recommend the Jigsaw chimes are used instead of any other instrument. Schools report that the Jigsaw Chimes really work, playing a key element in the delivery of the programme.

      • How do I use the Jigsaw Chime with a hearing-impaired child?

        The resonance of the Jigsaw Chime may bother a hearing-impaired child (with hearing aids). We recommend teachers to encourage the child to sit close to the chime with their fingers on the table next to the chime. They will then feel the resonance in their bodies.

      • Will I still need to buy lots of resources if I use Jigsaw?

        We listen to teachers and we are aware of limited budgets. Jigsaw has been created as a stand-alone resource so you will not need to buy any resources other than consumable art and craft supplies e.g. paper and crayons.

        Every lesson plan includes links to the resources needed to deliver it including the slides, Calm Me script, pictures etc. Jigsaw is a stand-alone resource needing no further outlay in Key Stages 1 and 2.

        There are suggested picture books that schools can buy to support the programme, but these are optional, particularly at Key Stages 1 and 2.
        The suggested picture books are more integral to teaching in Reception and Nursery, but many schools find they already have many of these titles, or have their own favourites on the same themes they can use instead.

        Teachers are free to enhance our resource, and as they become more confident with the programme, we encourage them to take greater ownership over the content.

        Our growing Twitter feed often illustrates good ideas and lesson successes. We also encourage schools to formally share their success stories on our website. When you become a Jigsaw school, you instantly become part of a growing and vibrant world-wide family of schools.

      • Can my TA teach Jigsaw In PPA time?

        TAs and HLTAs can teach Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE. The lesson plans are detailed and all the resources are included. However, we strongly recommend that teachers deliver Jigsaw as this programme provides on-going opportunities to get to know and build a strong relationship with the children. It also enables teachers to use the strategies in Jigsaw across the curriculum.

      • Do you offer inspection copies of Jigsaw?

        We offer our FREE Overview of Jigsaw PSHE teaching resources and product videos. To access this overview, you can request it here.

      • How much curriculum time is needed to teach Jigsaw lessons?

        Up until Year 3 we would expect at least 45 minutes to be allocated for a Jigsaw lesson.

        From Year 4 this increases to 1 hour per lesson.

        It is possible to deliver the ‘Connect Us’ activity as a separate entity.

        Schools that commit to a regular weekly slot find that Jigsaw PSHE will have a full and positive impact on learning behaviours and school ethos. The PSHE curriculum quickly becomes embedded and helps contribute to the school as a positive learning community.

      • Do we need a Jigsaw Friend for each class?

        The Jigsaw Friend is integral to this system of learning. It acts as the talking object in the Jigsaw circle and can take on the role of a distancing tool, helping children talk about sensitive issues; and so the children will develop a positive relationship with their Jigsaw Friend.

        Therefore, it is really important that each class has its own Jigsaw Friend. The Friends need to be respected and treated as special in order to obtain the most impact.

        We do not sell Jigsaw Friends to anyone other than schools using Jigsaw in order to keep their fidelity and specialness for children.

      • Do I have to use the Jigsaw Chime or can I use another instrument?

        The Jigsaw Chimes have been specially selected for their pitch and duration of resonance. This helps children to focus for longer when listening to them. The sound helps draw a line between whatever they were previously thinking about and the focus of the ‘Calm Me’ time.

        So, we strongly recommend the Jigsaw chimes are used instead of any other instrument. Schools report that the Jigsaw Chimes really work, playing a key element in the delivery of the programme.

      • How do I use the Jigsaw Chime with a hearing-impaired child?

        The resonance of the Jigsaw Chime may bother a hearing-impaired child (with hearing aids). We recommend teachers to encourage the child to sit close to the chime with their fingers on the table next to the chime. They will then feel the resonance in their bodies.

      • Will I still need to buy lots of resources if I use Jigsaw?

        We listen to teachers and we are aware of limited budgets. Jigsaw has been created as a stand-alone resource so you will not need to buy any resources other than consumable art and craft supplies e.g. paper and crayons.

        Every lesson plan includes links to the resources needed to deliver it including the slides, Calm Me script, pictures etc. Jigsaw is a stand-alone resource needing no further outlay in Key Stages 1 and 2.

        There are suggested picture books that schools can buy to support the programme, but these are optional, particularly at Key Stages 1 and 2.
        The suggested picture books are more integral to teaching in Reception and Nursery, but many schools find they already have many of these titles, or have their own favourites on the same themes they can use instead.

        Teachers are free to enhance our resource, and as they become more confident with the programme, we encourage them to take greater ownership over the content.

        Our growing Twitter feed often illustrates good ideas and lesson successes. We also encourage schools to formally share their success stories on our website. When you become a Jigsaw school, you instantly become part of a growing and vibrant world-wide family of schools.

      • Can my TA teach Jigsaw In PPA time?

        TAs and HLTAs can teach Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE. The lesson plans are detailed and all the resources are included. However, we strongly recommend that teachers deliver Jigsaw as this programme provides on-going opportunities to get to know and build a strong relationship with the children. It also enables teachers to use the strategies in Jigsaw across the curriculum.

      • Do you offer inspection copies of Jigsaw?

        We offer our FREE Overview of Jigsaw PSHE teaching resources and product videos. To access this overview, you can request it here.

      • How much curriculum time is needed to teach Jigsaw lessons?

        In P1 to P3, we would expect at least 45 minutes to be allocated for a Jigsaw lesson.

        In P4 to P7 this increases to 1 hour per lesson.

        It is possible to deliver the ‘Connect Us’ activity as a separate entity.

        Schools that commit to a regular weekly slot find that Jigsaw PSHE will have a full and positive impact on learning behaviours and school ethos. The PSHE curriculum quickly becomes embedded and helps to develop the school as a positive learning community.

      • Do we need a Jigsaw Friend for each class?

        The Jigsaw Friend is integral to this system of learning. It acts as the talking object in the Jigsaw circle and can take on the role of a distancing tool, helping children talk about sensitive issues; and so the children will develop a positive relationship with their Jigsaw Friend.

        Therefore, it is really important that each class has its own Jigsaw Friend. The Friends need to be respected and treated as special in order to obtain the most impact.

        We do not sell Jigsaw Friends to anyone other than schools using Jigsaw in order to keep their fidelity and specialness for children.

      • Do I have to use the Jigsaw Chime or can I use another instrument?

        The Jigsaw Chimes have been specially selected for their pitch and duration of resonance. This helps children to focus for longer when listening to them. The sound helps draw a line between whatever they were previously thinking about and the focus of the ‘Calm Me’ time.

        So, we strongly recommend the Jigsaw chimes are used instead of any other instrument. Schools report that the Jigsaw Chimes really work, playing a key element in the delivery of the programme.

      • How do I use the Jigsaw Chime with a hearing-impaired child?

        The resonance of the Jigsaw Chime may bother a hearing-impaired child (with hearing aids). We recommend teachers to encourage the child to sit close to the chime with their fingers on the table next to the chime. They will then feel the resonance in their bodies.

      • Will I still need to buy lots of resources if I use Jigsaw?

        We listen to teachers and we are aware of limited budgets. Jigsaw has been created as a stand-alone resource so you will not need to buy any resources other than consumable art and craft supplies e.g. paper and crayons.

        Every lesson plan includes links to the resources needed to deliver it including the slides, Calm Me script, pictures etc. Jigsaw is a stand-alone resource needing no further outlay in Key Stages 1 and 2.

        There are suggested picture books that schools can buy to support the programme, but these are optional, particularly at Key Stages 1 and 2.
        The suggested picture books are more integral to teaching in Reception and Nursery, but many schools find they already have many of these titles, or have their own favourites on the same themes they can use instead.

        Teachers are free to enhance our resource, and as they become more confident with the programme, we encourage them to take greater ownership over the content.

        Our growing Twitter feed often illustrates good ideas and lesson successes. We also encourage schools to formally share their success stories on our website. When you become a Jigsaw school, you instantly become part of a growing and vibrant world-wide family of schools.

      • Can my TA teach Jigsaw In PPA time?

        TAs and HLTAs can teach Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE. The lesson plans are detailed and all the resources are included. However, we strongly recommend that teachers deliver Jigsaw as this programme provides on-going opportunities to get to know and build a strong relationship with the children. It also enables teachers to use the strategies in Jigsaw across the curriculum.

      • Do you offer inspection copies of Jigsaw?

        We offer our FREE Overview of Jigsaw PSHE teaching resources and product videos. To access this overview, you can request it here.

      • How much curriculum time is needed to teach Jigsaw lessons?

        In Phase 1 we would expect at least 45 minutes to be allocated for a Jigsaw lesson.

        In Phase 2 this increases to 1 hour per lesson.

        It is possible to deliver the ‘Connect Us’ activity as a separate entity.

        Schools that commit to a regular weekly slot find that Jigsaw PSHE will have a full and positive impact on learning behaviours and school ethos.

        The PSHE/HWB curriculum quickly becomes embedded and illustrates that the school is a positive learning community; fulfilling the new inspection focus of Estyn.

      • Do we need a Jigsaw Friend for each class?

        The Jigsaw Friend is integral to this system of learning. It acts as the talking object in the Jigsaw circle and can take on the role of a distancing tool, helping children talk about sensitive issues; and so the children will develop a positive relationship with their Jigsaw Friend.

        Therefore, it is really important that each class has its own Jigsaw Friend. The Friends need to be respected and treated as special in order to obtain the most impact.

        We do not sell Jigsaw Friends to anyone other than schools using Jigsaw in order to keep their fidelity and specialness for children.

      • Do I have to use the Jigsaw Chime or can I use another instrument?

        The Jigsaw Chimes have been specially selected for their pitch and duration of resonance. This helps children to focus for longer when listening to them. The sound helps draw a line between whatever they were previously thinking about and the focus of the ‘Calm Me’ time.

        So, we strongly recommend the Jigsaw chimes are used instead of any other instrument. Schools report that the Jigsaw Chimes really work, playing a key element in the delivery of the programme.

      • How do I use the Jigsaw Chime with a hearing-impaired child?

        The resonance of the Jigsaw Chime may bother a hearing-impaired child (with hearing aids). We recommend teachers to encourage the child to sit close to the chime with their fingers on the table next to the chime. They will then feel the resonance in their bodies.

      • Will I still need to buy lots of resources if I use Jigsaw?

        We listen to teachers and we are aware of limited budgets. Jigsaw has been created as a stand-alone resource so you will not need to buy any resources other than consumable art and craft supplies e.g. paper and crayons.

        Every lesson plan includes links to the resources needed to deliver it including the slides, Calm Me script, pictures etc. Jigsaw is a stand-alone resource needing no further outlay in Key Stages 1 and 2.

        There are suggested picture books that schools can buy to support the programme, but these are optional, particularly at Key Stages 1 and 2.
        The suggested picture books are more integral to teaching in Reception and Nursery, but many schools find they already have many of these titles, or have their own favourites on the same themes they can use instead.

        Teachers are free to enhance our resource, and as they become more confident with the programme, we encourage them to take greater ownership over the content.

        Our growing Twitter feed often illustrates good ideas and lesson successes. We also encourage schools to formally share their success stories on our website. When you become a Jigsaw school, you instantly become part of a growing and vibrant world-wide family of schools.

      • Can my TA teach Jigsaw In PPA time?

        TAs and HLTAs can teach Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE. The lesson plans are detailed and all the resources are included.

        However, we strongly recommend that teachers deliver Jigsaw as this programme provides on-going opportunities to get to know and build a strong relationship with the children. It also enables teachers to use the strategies in Jigsaw across the curriculum.

      • Do you offer inspection copies of Jigsaw?

        We offer our FREE Overview of Jigsaw PSHE teaching resources and product videos. To access this overview, you can request it here.

    • Common Jigsaw Resilience Questions

      • What is included in the Resilience package?

        The Jigsaw Resilience programme includes: the Resilience Scale itself, a scale for pupils to self-assess, methods for moderating and tracking findings, training PowerPoint presentations for teachers, a section on working with parents (including a presentation, Top Tips handout, and invitation letter template), interventions for teachers to use against the descriptors on the Scale, a 6-activity programme for building resilience, assemblies for 4-7 year olds and 7-11/12 year olds and a map showing which Jigsaw PSHE lessons additionally support the 10 resilience-building descriptors in each year group.

      • Do I need more than one Resilience package for my school?

        You only need one pack. When you buy Jigsaw Resilience you can use it for all the pupils in your school, this includes older primary pupils who you may want to involve in self-assessing using the Pupils’ Scale.

      • Does Jigsaw Resilience give us ideas as to how to actually build resilience once we have assessed where children are on the Scale?

        Jigsaw Resilience is full of ideas and methods for building resilience and engagement. There are interventions for teachers to use with each year group directly linked to the descriptors on the Scale, assemblies for KS1 and KS2, a 6-activity intervention programme for boosting resilience, which can be used in conjunction with pupils’ self-assessing and a map showing which Jigsaw PSHE lessons can support each of the 10 resilience-building descriptors in each year group.

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience contribute to children's well-being and mental health?

        Using the Scale initially really increases teachers’ understanding of how resilient and engaged their pupils are.

        This increased understanding and ‘culture of resilience’, combined with the many methods for improving pupil’s resilience and engagement contained in the resource, aids teachers in pro-actively improving children’s well-being and mental health.

        Combined with other indicators, it can also assist teachers/schools in recognising that a child needs professional intervention.

        The Resilience Scale is an effective screening tool, enabling teachers to understand children’s starting points and to inform appropriate interventions.

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience help with Ofsted?

        Using the resource allows schools to demonstrate evidence for many aspects of Ofsted’s framework for school inspection (England). In particular, it can help with evidence towards Personal Development, Behaviour and Attitude.

        A school who uses Jigsaw Resilience had the following quotes in their Ofsted Report
        “In the schools caring and supportive ethos, pupils develop strong resilience. Adults encourage them to take setbacks in their stride. As a result, pupils are ready to learn and outcomes are strong.”

        “The school places great importance on encouraging pupils to be resilient, so that they meet success and failure with the same strength of purpose. As a result, pupils persevere in their learning and try their best.”

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience work alongside Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE?

        Jigsaw Resilience is designed to assess pupils’ resilience and engagement and to provide suggested interventions. The Jigsaw PSHE Whole-School Programme works on building emotional well-being, mental health and resilience and the Resilience Scale can be used to measure resilience and to measure the impact of the Jigsaw PSHE Programme.

        Activities from the Jigsaw PSHE materials are used as targeted interventions forming a symbiotic relationship between Jigsaw Resilience and Jigsaw PSHE.

      • Will this add extra time to what teachers have to assess and their hectic schedules?

        The Scale itself is simple to use and teachers can assess pupils easily in just a few minutes. The initial introduction needs a little time set aside (a staff meeting for example) though it is an essential part of the process for teachers to initially reflect and build understanding, a PowerPoint presentation is included as part of the resource to take schools through this process.

      • Is there a risk that pupils may feel down about if their Resilience Score is low?

        Younger pupils up to the age of 9-10 don’t need to be aware of the Scale or their score. It will certainly help if they realise that resilience is an important trait and something the school are trying to build in them, though an awareness of their score in that regard is unnecessary.

        Older pupils (9/10+) can self-assess, though this is their own score and again they don’t need to be aware of how the teacher has scored them.


        Pupils who do feel down about their score or their resilience generally are hopefully those that teachers can help the most.

      • Can Jigsaw Resilience be run as an intervention, led by a teaching assistant, or does it have to be a whole class approach?

        Jigsaw Resilience can be effectively be run as an intervention by a TA after using the Scale to identify which children would benefit. The TA could use the methods outlined against the descriptors in the Scale to build a group of pupils’ resilience.

        On top of that, there is a 6-activity programme that can be used with small groups of pupils to build resilience, and depending on the age of the pupils they could also self-assess (works best with 9/10+). All of this is detailed in the resource.

      • Can parents be involved?

        Yes, Jigsaw Resilience has a section specifically to support schools to involve parents in the resilience-building process. A PowerPoint presentation, handout of Top Tips, together with an invitation letter template are included to help schools facilitate Parent Information sessions.

      • What is included in the Resilience package?

        The Jigsaw Resilience programme includes: the Resilience Scale itself, a scale for pupils to self-assess, methods for moderating and tracking findings, training PowerPoint presentations for teachers, a section on working with parents (including a presentation, Top Tips handout, and invitation letter template), interventions for teachers to use against the descriptors on the Scale, a 6-activity programme for building resilience, assemblies for 4-7 year olds and 7-11/12 year olds and a map showing which Jigsaw PSHE lessons additionally support the 10 resilience-building descriptors in each year group.

      • Do I need more than one Resilience package for my school?

        You only need one pack. When you buy Jigsaw Resilience you can use it for all the pupils in your school, this includes older primary pupils who you may want to involve in self-assessing using the Pupils’ Scale.

      • Does Jigsaw Resilience give us ideas as to how to actually build resilience once we have assessed where children are on the Scale?

        Jigsaw Resilience is full of ideas and methods for building resilience and engagement. There are interventions for teachers to use with each year group directly linked to the descriptors on the Scale, assemblies for KS1 and KS2, a 6-activity intervention programme for boosting resilience, which can be used in conjunction with pupils’ self-assessing and a map showing which Jigsaw PSHE lessons can support each of the 10 resilience-building descriptors in each year group.

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience contribute to children's well-being and mental health?

        Using the Scale initially really increases teachers’ understanding of how resilient and engaged their pupils are.

        This increased understanding and ‘culture of resilience’, combined with the many methods for improving pupil’s resilience and engagement contained in the resource, aids teachers in pro-actively improving children’s well-being and mental health.

        Combined with other indicators, it can also assist teachers/schools in recognising that a child needs professional intervention.

        The Resilience Scale is an effective screening tool, enabling teachers to understand children’s starting points and to inform appropriate interventions.

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience link to guidance from CIS?

        Using Jigsaw Resilience allows schools to demonstrate further aspects of support for children in the Well-being domain of the CIS framework. It also gives schools a way to demonstrate how they are able to assess individual pupils’ needs and progress, providing a simple way to not only identify where extra support may be needed, but also giving teachers the tools to support these children.

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience work alongside Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE?

        Jigsaw Resilience is designed to assess pupils’ resilience and engagement and to provide suggested interventions. The Jigsaw PSHE Whole-School Programme works on building emotional well-being, mental health and resilience and the Resilience Scale can be used to measure resilience and to measure the impact of the Jigsaw PSHE Programme.

        Activities from the Jigsaw PSHE materials are used as targeted interventions forming a symbiotic relationship between Jigsaw Resilience and Jigsaw PSHE.

      • Will this add extra time to what teachers have to assess and their hectic schedules?

        The Scale itself is simple to use and teachers can assess pupils easily in just a few minutes. The initial introduction needs a little time set aside (a staff meeting for example) though it is an essential part of the process for teachers to initially reflect and build understanding, a PowerPoint presentation is included as part of the resource to take schools through this process.

      • Is there a risk that pupils may feel down about if their Resilience Score is low?

        Younger pupils up to the age of 9-10 don’t need to be aware of the Scale or their score. It will certainly help if they realise that resilience is an important trait and something the school are trying to build in them, though an awareness of their score in that regard is unnecessary.

        Older pupils (9/10+) can self-assess, though this is their own score and again they don’t need to be aware of how the teacher has scored them.


        Pupils who do feel down about their score or their resilience generally are hopefully those that teachers can help the most.

      • Can Jigsaw Resilience be run as an intervention, led by a teaching assistant, or does it have to be a whole class approach?

        Jigsaw Resilience can be effectively be run as an intervention by a TA after using the Scale to identify which children would benefit. The TA could use the methods outlined against the descriptors in the Scale to build a group of pupils’ resilience.

        On top of that, there is a 6-activity programme that can be used with small groups of pupils to build resilience, and depending on the age of the pupils they could also self-assess (works best with 9/10+). All of this is detailed in the resource.

      • Can parents be involved?

        Yes, Jigsaw Resilience has a section specifically to support schools to involve parents in the resilience-building process. A PowerPoint presentation, handout of Top Tips, together with an invitation letter template are included to help schools facilitate Parent Information sessions.

      • What is included in the Resilience package?

        The Jigsaw Resilience programme includes: the Resilience Scale itself, a scale for pupils to self-assess, methods for moderating and tracking findings, training PowerPoint presentations for teachers, a section on working with parents (including a presentation, Top Tips handout, and invitation letter template), interventions for teachers to use against the descriptors on the Scale, a 6-activity programme for building resilience, assemblies for 4-7 year olds and 7-11/12 year olds and a map showing which Jigsaw PSHE lessons additionally support the 10 resilience-building descriptors in each year group.

      • Do I need more than one Resilience package for my school?

        You only need one pack. When you buy Jigsaw Resilience you can use it for all the pupils in your school, this includes older primary pupils who you may want to involve in self-assessing using the Pupils’ Scale.

      • Does Jigsaw Resilience give us ideas as to how to actually build resilience once we have assessed where children are on the Scale?

        Jigsaw Resilience is full of ideas and methods for building resilience and engagement. There are interventions for teachers to use with each year group directly linked to the descriptors on the Scale, assemblies for KS1 and KS2, a 6-activity intervention programme for boosting resilience, which can be used in conjunction with pupils’ self-assessing and a map showing which Jigsaw PSHE lessons can support each of the 10 resilience-building descriptors in each year group.

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience contribute to children's well-being and mental health?

        Using the Scale initially really increases teachers’ understanding of how resilient and engaged their pupils are.

        This increased understanding and ‘culture of resilience’, combined with the many methods for improving pupil’s resilience and engagement contained in the resource, aids teachers in pro-actively improving children’s well-being and mental health.

        Combined with other indicators, it can also assist teachers/schools in recognising that a child needs professional intervention.

        The Resilience Scale is an effective screening tool, enabling teachers to understand children’s starting points and to inform appropriate interventions.

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience help with ETI?

        Using the resource allows schools to demonstrate evidence for many aspects of ETI’s self-evaluation framework including the sections on Individual Learning Experiences, and Care and Welfare.

        ETI’s “Stepping up and Stepping Forward” Learning Insights (updated 2022) shares ideas on how schools have needed to respond in new ways to find out what the mental health needs of different young people are following the pandemic, and stresses the importance of schools being able to listen to support children with this according to their needs. Jigsaw Resilience provides a simple way for schools to identify some of these children and then give them extra support.

        Jigsaw Resilience also contributes to the Early Support section of the model for supporting young people in schools recommended in the ‘Children & Young People’s Emotional Health and Wellbeing in Education Framework’ from the Department of Education and Department of Health in Feb 2021.

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience work alongside Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE?

        engagement and to provide suggested interventions. The Jigsaw PSHE Whole-School Programme works on building emotional well-being, mental health and resilience and the Resilience Scale can be used to measure resilience and to measure the impact of the Jigsaw PSHE Programme.

        Activities from the Jigsaw PSHE materials are used as targeted interventions forming a symbiotic relationship between Jigsaw Resilience and Jigsaw PSHE.

      • Will this add extra time to what teachers have to assess and their hectic schedules?

        The Scale itself is simple to use and teachers can assess pupils easily in just a few minutes. The initial introduction needs a little time set aside (a staff meeting for example) though it is an essential part of the process for teachers to initially reflect and build understanding, a PowerPoint presentation is included as part of the resource to take schools through this process.

      • Is there a risk that pupils may feel down about if their Resilience Score is low?

        Younger pupils up to the age of 9-10 don’t need to be aware of the Scale or their score. It will certainly help if they realise that resilience is an important trait and something the school are trying to build in them, though an awareness of their score in that regard is unnecessary.

        Older pupils (9/10+) can self-assess, though this is their own score and again they don’t need to be aware of how the teacher has scored them.

        Pupils who do feel down about their score or their resilience generally are hopefully those that teachers can help the most.

      • Can Jigsaw Resilience be run as an intervention, led by a teaching assistant, or does it have to be a whole class approach?

        Jigsaw Resilience can be effectively be run as an intervention by a TA after using the Scale to identify which children would benefit. The TA could use the methods outlined against the descriptors in the Scale to build a group of pupils’ resilience.

        On top of that, there is a 6-activity programme that can be used with small groups of pupils to build resilience, and depending on the age of the pupils they could also self-assess (works best with 9/10+). All of this is detailed in the resource.

      • Can parents be involved?

        Yes, Jigsaw Resilience has a section specifically to support schools to involve parents in the resilience-building process. A PowerPoint presentation, handout of Top Tips, together with an invitation letter template are included to help schools facilitate Parent Information sessions.

      • What is included in the Resilience package?

        The Jigsaw Resilience programme includes: the Resilience Scale itself, a scale for pupils to self-assess, methods for moderating and tracking findings, training PowerPoint presentations for teachers, a section on working with parents (including a presentation, Top Tips handout, and invitation letter template), interventions for teachers to use against the descriptors on the Scale, a 6-activity programme for building resilience, assemblies for 4-7 year olds and 7-11/12 year olds and a map showing which Jigsaw PSHE lessons additionally support the 10 resilience-building descriptors in each year group.

      • Do I need more than one Resilience package for my school?

        You only need one pack. When you buy Jigsaw Resilience you can use it for all the pupils in your school, this includes older primary pupils who you may want to involve in self-assessing using the Pupils’ Scale.

      • Does Jigsaw Resilience give us ideas as to how to actually build resilience once we have assessed where children are on the Scale?

        Jigsaw Resilience is full of ideas and methods for building resilience and engagement. There are interventions for teachers to use with each year group directly linked to the descriptors on the Scale, assemblies for KS1 and KS2, a 6-activity intervention programme for boosting resilience, which can be used in conjunction with pupils’ self-assessing and a map showing which Jigsaw PSHE lessons can support each of the 10 resilience-building descriptors in each year group.

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience contribute to children's well-being and mental health?

        Using the Scale initially really increases teachers’ understanding of how resilient and engaged their pupils are.
         
        This increased understanding and ‘culture of resilience’, combined with the many methods for improving pupil’s resilience and engagement contained in the resource, aids teachers in pro-actively improving children’s well-being and mental health.
         
        Combined with other indicators, it can also assist teachers/schools in recognising that a child needs professional intervention.
         
        The Resilience Scale is an effective screening tool, enabling teachers to understand children’s starting points and to inform appropriate interventions.
      • How does REST link to guidance from Education Scotland?

        Using the resource allows schools to demonstrate evidence for many aspects of Education Scotland’s “Health and Wellbeing: A Thematic Review” (2022).

        This report gives examples of good practice where schools have used systems to identify pupils who need further support as part of a whole school approach, but recognises this is an ongoing issue for schools that needs to be prioritised.

        Jigsaw Resilience provides a simple way to not only identify where extra support may e needs, but also provides the tools to support these children.

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience work alongside Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE?

        Jigsaw Resilience is designed to assess pupils’ resilience and engagement and to provide suggested interventions. The Jigsaw PSHE Whole-School Programme works on building emotional well-being, mental health and resilience and the Resilience Scale can be used to measure resilience and to measure the impact of the Jigsaw PSHE Programme.

        Activities from the Jigsaw PSHE materials are used as targeted interventions forming a symbiotic relationship between Jigsaw Resilience and Jigsaw PSHE.

      • Will this add extra time to what teachers have to assess and their hectic schedules?

        The Scale itself is simple to use and teachers can assess pupils easily in just a few minutes. The initial introduction needs a little time set aside (a staff meeting for example) though it is an essential part of the process for teachers to initially reflect and build understanding, a PowerPoint presentation is included as part of the resource to take schools through this process.

      • Is there a risk that pupils may feel down about if their Resilience Score is low?

        Younger pupils up to the age of 9-10 don’t need to be aware of the Scale or their score. It will certainly help if they realise that resilience is an important trait and something the school are trying to build in them, though an awareness of their score in that regard is unnecessary.

        Older pupils (9/10+) can self-assess, though this is their own score and again they don’t need to be aware of how the teacher has scored them.

        Pupils who do feel down about their score or their resilience generally are hopefully those that teachers can help the most.

      • Can Jigsaw Resilience be run as an intervention, led by a teaching assistant, or does it have to be a whole class approach?

        Jigsaw Resilience can be effectively be run as an intervention by a TA after using the Scale to identify which children would benefit. The TA could use the methods outlined against the descriptors in the Scale to build a group of pupils’ resilience.
         
        On top of that, there is a 6-activity programme that can be used with small groups of pupils to build resilience, and depending on the age of the pupils they could also self-assess (works best with 9/10+). All of this is detailed in the resource.
      • Can parents be involved?

        Yes, Jigsaw Resilience has a section specifically to support schools to involve parents in the resilience-building process. A PowerPoint presentation, handout of Top Tips, together with an invitation letter template are included to help schools facilitate Parent Information sessions.

      • What is included in the Resilience package?

        The Jigsaw Resilience programme includes: the Resilience Scale itself, a scale for pupils to self-assess, methods for moderating and tracking findings, training PowerPoint presentations for teachers, a section on working with parents (including a presentation, Top Tips handout, and invitation letter template), interventions for teachers to use against the descriptors on the Scale, a 6-activity programme for building resilience, assemblies for 4-7 year olds and 7-11/12 year olds and a map showing which Jigsaw PSHE lessons additionally support the 10 resilience-building descriptors in each year group.

      • Do I need more than one Resilience package for my school?

        You only need one pack. When you buy Jigsaw Resilience you can use it for all the pupils in your school, this includes older primary pupils who you may want to involve in self-assessing using the Pupils’ Scale.

      • Does Jigsaw Resilience give us ideas as to how to actually build resilience once we have assessed where children are on the Scale?

        Jigsaw Resilience is full of ideas and methods for building resilience and engagement. There are interventions for teachers to use with each year group directly linked to the descriptors on the Scale, assemblies for KS1 and KS2, a 6-activity intervention programme for boosting resilience, which can be used in conjunction with pupils’ self-assessing and a map showing which Jigsaw PSHE lessons can support each of the 10 resilience-building descriptors in each year group.

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience contribute to children's well-being and mental health?

        Using the Scale initially really increases teachers’ understanding of how resilient and engaged their pupils are.

        This increased understanding and ‘culture of resilience’, combined with the many methods for improving pupil’s resilience and engagement contained in the resource, aids teachers in pro-actively improving children’s well-being and mental health.

        Combined with other indicators, it can also assist teachers/schools in recognising that a child needs professional intervention.

        The Resilience Scale is an effective screening tool, enabling teachers to understand children’s starting points and to inform appropriate interventions.

      • How does Jigsaw Resilience help with Estyn?

        Using the resource allows schools to demonstrate evidence for many aspects of Estyn’s guidance around building resilience in schools, following the findings of the 2020 report. 
         
        Many aspects identified as good practice come through the strategies used in Jigsaw 3-11 and 11-16, but also in the Main Findings section of Estyn’s , Learner resilience - building resilience in primary schools, secondary schools and pupil referral units July 2020 , it says:
         
        "Schools that are successful in building pupils’ resilience have leaders that have developed a strong vision, supported by core values around promoting the wellbeing of all pupils. The vision is shared by all of the schools’ stakeholders. They provide interventions for those pupils that need them the most as well as implementing successful strategies for whole-class situations when appropriate. These schools also place a strong emphasis on the wellbeing of their staff."
         
        Jigsaw Resilience provides school with a simple and effective way of identifying those children who may need this extra support either in small groups or even as whole classes, and gives schools staff the tools to support pupils to build their resilience and engagement.
      • How does Jigsaw Resilience work alongside Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE?

        Jigsaw Resilience is designed to assess pupils’ resilience and engagement and to provide suggested interventions. The Jigsaw PSHE Whole-School Programme works on building emotional well-being, mental health and resilience and the Resilience Scale can be used to measure resilience and to measure the impact of the Jigsaw PSHE Programme.

        Activities from the Jigsaw PSHE materials are used as targeted interventions forming a symbiotic relationship between Jigsaw Resilience and Jigsaw PSHE.

      • Will this add extra time to what teachers have to assess and their hectic schedules?

        The Scale itself is simple to use and teachers can assess pupils easily in just a few minutes. The initial introduction needs a little time set aside (a staff meeting for example) though it is an essential part of the process for teachers to initially reflect and build understanding, a PowerPoint presentation is included as part of the resource to take schools through this process.

      • Is there a risk that pupils may feel down about if their Resilience Score is low?

        Younger pupils up to the age of 9-10 don’t need to be aware of the Scale or their score. It will certainly help if they realise that resilience is an important trait and something the school are trying to build in them, though an awareness of their score in that regard is unnecessary.

        Older pupils (9/10+) can self-assess, though this is their own score and again they don’t need to be aware of how the teacher has scored them.

        Pupils who do feel down about their score or their resilience generally are hopefully those that teachers can help the most.

      • Can Jigsaw Resilience be run as an intervention, led by a teaching assistant, or does it have to be a whole class approach?

        Jigsaw Resilience can be effectively be run as an intervention by a TA after using the Scale to identify which children would benefit. The TA could use the methods outlined against the descriptors in the Scale to build a group of pupils’ resilience.

        On top of that, there is a 6-activity programme that can be used with small groups of pupils to build resilience, and depending on the age of the pupils they could also self-assess (works best with 9/10+). All of this is detailed in the resource.

      • Can parents be involved?

        Yes, Jigsaw Resilience has a section specifically to support schools to involve parents in the resilience-building process. A PowerPoint presentation, handout of Top Tips, together with an invitation letter template are included to help schools facilitate Parent Information sessions.

    • Common Family/Carers Questions

      • Can we involve Parents/Carers with the Jigsaw PSHE programme?

        Jigsaw knows that parents and carers play the largest role in children’s personal, social and health development.

        We encourage our schools to stay engaged with parents and carers through the introduction and ongoing delivery of Jigsaw through sharing the parent leaflets, summaries of what is going on in each classroom each term, and maintaining the open relationship between class teachers and parents and carers that makes such a difference to the individual children.

      • Can we involve Parents/Carers with the Jigsaw PSHE programme?

        Jigsaw knows that parents and carers play the largest role in children’s personal, social and health development.

        We encourage our schools to stay engaged with parents and carers through the introduction and ongoing delivery of Jigsaw through sharing the parent leaflets, summaries of what is going on in each classroom each term, and maintaining the open relationship between class teachers and parents and carers that makes such a difference to the individual children.

      • Can we involve Parents/Carers with the Jigsaw PSHE programme?

        Jigsaw knows that parents and carers play the largest role in children’s personal, social and health development.

        We encourage our schools to stay engaged with parents and carers through the introduction and ongoing delivery of Jigsaw through sharing the parent leaflets, summaries of what is going on in each classroom each term, and maintaining the open relationship between class teachers and parents and carers that makes such a difference to the individual children.

      • Can we involve Parents/Carers with the Jigsaw PSHE programme?

        Jigsaw knows that parents and carers play the largest role in children’s personal, social and health development.

        We encourage our schools to stay engaged with parents and carers through the introduction and ongoing delivery of Jigsaw through sharing the parent leaflets, summaries of what is going on in each classroom each term, and maintaining the open relationship between class teachers and parents and carers that makes such a difference to the individual children.

      • Can we involve Parents/Carers with the Jigsaw PSHE programme?

        Jigsaw knows that parents and carers play the largest role in children’s personal, social and health development.

        We encourage our schools to stay engaged with parents and carers through the introduction and ongoing delivery of Jigsaw through sharing the parent leaflets, summaries of what is going on in each classroom each term, and maintaining the open relationship between class teachers and parents and carers that makes such a difference to the individual children.

    • Common Secondary Senior Leader Questions

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 contribute to our school’s safeguarding requirements?

        Ofsted has stated that schools and colleges should be safe environments where students can learn. Put simply, Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, helps to teach students about keeping themselves safe both physically and emotionally, including when using technology.

        All the way through the Jigsaw Programme, students are taught in age- and stage-appropriate ways, about what to say and do if they don’t feel safe in a situation, or if something feels uncomfortable or not right to them, from bullying and unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology. The emphasis is on helping students realise their independence and be responsible for themselves whilst knowing how and where to access advice and support when they need it.

        The Jigsaw 11-16 materials have been mapped to the latest Ofsted requirements and this can be seen on the Community area of the website (for schools that have bought the Jigsaw 11-16 programme only).

      • If we use Jigsaw 11-16, will we meet the requirements for statutory Relationships, Sex and Health Education 2020?

        Both the content and the approach of Jigsaw means that schools delivering their PSHE though the Jigsaw Programme will fully meet the DfE requirements, subject of course, to schools delivering the scheme with fidelity.

        Jigsaw also provides detailed mapping documents showing exactly where each of the statutory statements is taught in the programme, so that schools can see where they can adapt or extend any of this content further to meet any specific needs for their school community.

        Furthermore, we will always respond to any further guidance from the DfE and Ofsted and update our materials where necessary.

      • How can Jigsaw 11-16 help my school with its Prevent agenda?

        Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, makes a significant contribution towards ensuring that the curriculum and the learning environment that students experience lays down a grounding in which the ideological and emotional roots of extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours cannot flourish.

        This contribution emerges first and foremost through the underpinning philosophy of the Jigsaw Programme and the learning styles it advocates, but also through many aspects of the specific content of the themes or ‘Puzzles’ that make up the Programme.

        Students are taught and empowered to know their own minds, to operate from a position of self-awareness, mindfulness and self-valuing, and to develop the capacity to empathise with others as well as to think with discernment.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 support teaching about British values?

        Jigsaw ensures all strands of the British Values agenda are given coverage throughout the Programme. They have been mapped across the year groups and across each of the Puzzles (units) to ensure that there is full coverage of development opportunities through the entire scheme – featuring in every Jigsaw Piece (lesson).

        Elements of each Jigsaw lesson will support student development of British values: democracy, rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect and tolerance of others.

        These are perhaps most explicitly seen in the ‘Celebrating Difference’ and ‘Dreams and Goals’ Puzzles (units), however, it is implicit in every lesson.

        Jigsaw schools can find the mapping document for British Values, SMSC and Emotional Literacy in their Community Area.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 support the latest Ofsted requirements?

        Jigsaw supports schools in their duty to provide:
        • A broad and balanced curriculum
        • Opportunities for SMSC
        • Support for student well-being
         
        Furthermore, Jigsaw provides explicit teaching, supporting the ‘Behaviour and Attitudes’ and ‘Personal Development’ strands of the Ofsted framework, in addition to discrete teaching on diversity, which supports the ‘Equalities’ duty.
         
         Mapping documents on the Community Area show in more detail how specific lessons and units serve the Ofsted framework.
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 support SMSC development?

        Even if Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural (SMSC) elements were not a high priority for Ofsted, we would still value these aspects of students’ development and believe that Jigsaw enhances each of them.

        We have mapped SMSC across each Puzzle and across each year group to ensure a balanced coverage.

        Every Jigsaw Piece (lesson) contributes to SMSC, there is a mapping document in the community area which shows this along with British Values and Emotional Literacy Domains.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 help students prepare for further study or work-life?

        Employability Skills are a key feature throughout Jigsaw, sometimes explicitly described as such, sometimes more implicit in lessons. Each Puzzle (unit) includes a lesson where the activities lend themselves to providing students with evidence of their personal development through activities in a Jigsaw Workbook.

        In order for students to gain the most from the Jigsaw Programme, it is important that they have the chance to experience the full lesson (Learning Pod, the Big Bit, Finishing Facts and the Signpost) to make best use of the opportunity to develop the skills that will prove valuable as they continue their career journey.

        There are numerous lessons in every year group that explore the world of work and further study, most of which appear in the Dreams & Goals and Being Me in My World Puzzles (units).

        The Jigsaw PSHE programme provides well researched lessons covering essential areas in the development of a student’s life. It helps them build self-esteem and resilience while encouraging them to recognise their own strengths.

        This process will enable them to make healthy and positive decisions in their lives. Looking after the mental and physical health of students is a major focus for this Programme; a student who is able to develop strategies to deal with teenage life will be more equipped to succeed academically and holistically. This is value for money in any currency.’

        In terms of the monetary value of Jigsaw, each year group’s resource costs less than 2 days’ supply cover. Can any PSHE teacher plan 36 lessons in less than 2 days and ensure they meet statutory requirements, fit into a spiral curriculum, have summative assessment tasks etc?

        We strive to keep the cost of Jigsaw as affordable as possible for every school.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 contribute to our school’s safeguarding requirements?

        The International Task Force on Child Protection Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy (2016), explains how schools must have formal learning programmes in place , “which cover areas such as bullying personal safety, physical abuse, manipulation, grooming, online safety, healthy sexual behaviour, neglect and negligent behaviour, self-harm, staying safe away from home, commercial exploitation and disclosing abuse.”
         
        Put simply, Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, helps to teach students about keeping themselves safe both physically and emotionally, including when using technology. 
         
        All the way through the Jigsaw Programme, students are taught in age- and stage-appropriate ways, about what to say and do if they don’t feel safe in a situation, or if something feels uncomfortable or not right to them, from bullying and unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology. 
         
        The emphasis is on helping students realise their independence and be responsible for themselves whilst knowing how and where to access advice and support when they need it.
      • How can Jigsaw 11-16 help my school with its guarding against radicalisation and extremism?

        Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, makes a significant contribution towards ensuring that the curriculum and the learning environment that students experience lays down a grounding in which the ideological and emotional roots of extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours cannot flourish.

        This contribution emerges first and foremost through the underpinning philosophy of the Jigsaw Programme and the learning styles it advocates, but also through many aspects of the specific content of the themes or ‘Puzzles’ that make up the Programme.

        Students are taught and empowered to know their own minds, to operate from a position of self-awareness, mindfulness and self-valuing, and to develop the capacity to empathise with others as well as to think with discernment.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 support SMSC development?

        Jigsaw highly values these aspects of students’ development and believe that Jigsaw enhances each of them.

        We have mapped SMSC across each Puzzle and across each year group to ensure a balanced coverage.

        Every Jigsaw Piece (lesson) contributes to SMSC, there is a mapping document in the community area which shows this along with British Values and Emotional Literacy Domains..

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 help students prepare for further study or work-life?

        Employability Skills are a key feature throughout Jigsaw, sometimes explicitly described as such, sometimes more implicit in lessons. Each Puzzle (unit) includes a lesson where the activities lend themselves to providing students with evidence of their personal development through activities in a Jigsaw Workbook.

        In order for students to gain the most from the Jigsaw Programme, it is important that they have the chance to experience the full lesson (Learning Pod, the Big Bit, Finishing Facts and the Signpost) to make best use of the opportunity to develop the skills that will prove valuable as they continue their career journey.

        There are numerous lessons in every year group that explore the world of work and further study, most of which appear in the Dreams & Goals and Being Me in My World Puzzles (units).

        The Jigsaw PSHE programme provides well researched lessons covering essential areas in the development of a student’s life. It helps them build self-esteem and resilience while encouraging them to recognise their own strengths.

        This process will enable them to make healthy and positive decisions in their lives. Looking after the mental and physical health of students is a major focus for this Programme; a student who is able to develop strategies to deal with teenage life will be more equipped to succeed academically and holistically. This is value for money in any currency.’

        In terms of the monetary value of Jigsaw, each year group’s resource costs less than 2 days’ supply cover. Can any PSHE teacher plan 36 lessons in less than 2 days and ensure they meet statutory requirements, fit into a spiral curriculum, have summative assessment tasks etc?

        We strive to keep the cost of Jigsaw as affordable as possible for every school.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 contribute to our school’s safeguarding requirements?

        The Department’s updated guidance on safeguarding from 2020 explained how safeguarding goes beyond child protection, and begins with, “preventative education and activities which enable children and young people to grow up safely and securely in circumstances where their development and wellbeing is promoted.” Put simply, Jigsaw helps to teach children about the keeping themselves safe and promotes an ethos in school that strongly supports keeping children safe in many diverse situations.

        As ever, the emphasis is on helping children realise their independence and responsibility for themselves, rather than employing scare tactics and horror stories to frighten children and dissuade them from choosing certain paths. This content reflects the most up-to-date guidance from the Department and ETI which recommends that schools have a planned preventative programme for RSE as part of PD+MU, with clear policies and starting from the very beginning of school.

        All the way through the Jigsaw Programme, students are taught in age- and stage-appropriate ways, about what to say and do if they don’t feel safe in a situation, or if something feels uncomfortable or not right to them, from bullying and unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology. The emphasis is on helping students realise their independence and be responsible for themselves whilst knowing how and where to access advice and support when they need it.

        Link to Department’s Guidance here.

      • If we use Jigsaw 11-16, will we meet the requirements for statutory Relationships and Sexuality Education?

        Both the content and the approach of Jigsaw means that schools delivering their PSHE though the Jigsaw Programme will fully meet the DE requirements for RSE, subject of course, to schools delivering the scheme with fidelity.

        Jigsaw also provides detailed mapping documents showing exactly where each of the statutory statements is taught in the programme, so that schools can see where they can adapt or extend any of this content further to meet any specific needs for their school community.

        Furthermore, the digital nature of the resources means that we can continue to ensure that these materials are kept up to date with any new guidance in this area as we can adapt the content when changes are made.

      • If we use Jigsaw 11-16, will we meet the requirements for statutory Personal Development?

        Schools using Jigsaw 11-16 will have all the teaching content they need to meet the expectations for Personal Development in KS3; Self Awareness, Personal Health and Relationships. It also meets expectations for thes same 3 strands in KS4.

        Jigsaw also contributes to the further KS4 PD themes of Parenting and Independent Living, and can be used as a basis for schools to add their own further material to meet the needs of the pupils in the school.

      • Does the teaching and learning in Jigsaw contribute towards the requirements for Learning for Life and Work?

        As part of a wide PSHE curriculum, themes that are relevant to Home Economics, Education for Employability, and Local and Global Citizenship are threaded throughout the planning in Jigsaw 11-16.

        Schools can use the clear mapping documents to see where they feel they need to add further content to meet the needs of their pupils, and to meet the statutory expectations.

      • How can Jigsaw 11-16 help my school with its Prevent agenda?

        Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, makes a significant contribution towards ensuring that the curriculum and the learning environment that students experience lays down a grounding in which the ideological and emotional roots of extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours cannot flourish.

        This contribution emerges first and foremost through the underpinning philosophy of the Jigsaw Programme and the learning styles it advocates, but also through many aspects of the specific content of the themes or ‘Puzzles’ that make up the Programme.

        Students are taught and empowered to know their own minds, to operate from a position of self-awareness, mindfulness and self-valuing, and to develop the capacity to empathise with others as well as to think with discernment.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 support the latest ETI requirements?

        Jigsaw is structured in a way that enables schools to see where and how the content supports schools in their duty to provide the teaching and learning that they need to show through their self evaluation framework documents for ETI, including (but not exclusively) in areas such as:
        • Progression
        • Wider skills and dispositions/capabilities
        • Care and Welfare
        • Safeguarding
         
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 support SMSC development?

        Jigsaw values the Spiritual, Moral, Social, Moral and Cultural aspects of students’ development and believe that Jigsaw enhances each of them.

        We have mapped SMSC across each Puzzle and across each year group to ensure a balanced coverage.

        Every Jigsaw Piece (lesson) contributes to SMSC, there is a mapping document in the community area which shows this along with Emotional Literacy Domains.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 help students prepare for further study or work-life?

        Employability Skills are a key feature throughout Jigsaw, sometimes explicitly described as such, sometimes more implicit in lessons. Each Puzzle (unit) includes a lesson where the activities lend themselves to providing students with evidence of their personal development through activities in a Jigsaw Workbook.

        In order for students to gain the most from the Jigsaw Programme, it is important that they have the chance to experience the full lesson (Learning Pod, the Big Bit, Finishing Facts and the Signpost) to make best use of the opportunity to develop the skills that will prove valuable as they continue their career journey.

        There are numerous lessons in every year group that explore the world of work and further study, most of which appear in the Dreams & Goals and Being Me in My World Puzzles (units).

      • Is Jigsaw good value for money?

        The Jigsaw PSHE programme provides well-researched lessons covering essential areas in a student’s life development. It helps them build self-esteem and resilience while encouraging them to recognise their own strengths.

        This process will enable them to make healthy and positive decisions in their lives. Looking after the mental and physical health of students is a significant focus of this Programme; a student who is able to develop strategies to deal with teenage life will be more equipped to succeed academically and holistically. This is value for money in any currency.’

        In terms of the monetary value of Jigsaw, each year group’s resource costs less than 2 days’ supply cover. Can any PSHE teacher plan 36 lessons in less than 2 days and ensure they meet statutory requirements, fit into a spiral curriculum, have summative assessment tasks etc?

        We strive to keep the cost of Jigsaw as affordable as possible for every school.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 contribute to our school’s safeguarding requirements?

        Education Scotland’s Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy (Aug 2020), explains how education providers will help children, young people and adults to be safe, nurtured, achieving, healthy, active, included, respected and responsible; and children, young people and adults in Scotland to become successful learners, confident individuals, responsible citizens and effective contributors in centres of learning, the workplace and the community.

        Put simply, Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, helps to teach students about keeping themselves safe both physically and emotionally, including when using technology.

        All the way through the Jigsaw Programme, students are taught in age- and stage-appropriate ways, about what to say and do if they don’t feel safe in a situation, or if something feels uncomfortable or not right to them, from bullying and unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology.

        The emphasis is on helping students realise their independence and be responsible for themselves whilst knowing how and where to access advice and support when they need it.

      • How can Jigsaw 11-16 help my school with its Prevent agenda?

        Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, makes a significant contribution towards ensuring that the curriculum and the learning environment that students experience lays down a grounding in which the ideological and emotional roots of extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours cannot flourish.

        This contribution emerges first and foremost through the underpinning philosophy of the Jigsaw Programme and the learning styles it advocates, but also through many aspects of the specific content of the themes or ‘Puzzles’ that make up the Programme.

        Students are taught and empowered to know their own minds, to operate from a position of self-awareness, mindfulness and self-valuing, and to develop the capacity to empathise with others as well as to think with discernment.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 support SMSC development?

        Jigsaw highly values these aspects of students’ development and believe that Jigsaw enhances each of them.

        We have mapped SMSC across each Puzzle and across each year group to ensure a balanced coverage.

        Every Jigsaw Piece (lesson) contributes to SMSC, there is a mapping document in the community area which shows this along with British Values and Emotional Literacy Domains.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 help students prepare for further study or work-life?

        Employability Skills are a key feature throughout Jigsaw, sometimes explicitly described as such, sometimes more implicit in lessons. Each Puzzle (unit) includes a lesson where the activities lend themselves to providing students with evidence of their personal development through activities in a Jigsaw Workbook.

        For students to gain the most from the Jigsaw Programme, they must have the chance to experience the full lesson (Learning Pod, the Big Bit, Finishing Facts and the Signpost) to make best use of the opportunity to develop the skills that will prove valuable as they continue their career journey.

        There are numerous lessons in every year group that explore the world of work and further study, most of which appear in the Dreams & Goals and Being Me in My World Puzzles (units).

        The Jigsaw PSHE programme provides well-researched lessons covering essential areas in the development of a student’s life. It helps them build self-esteem and resilience while encouraging them to recognise their own strengths. This process will enable them to make healthy and positive decisions in their lives.

        Looking after the mental and physical health of students is a major focus for this Programme; a student who is able to develop strategies to deal with teenage life will be more equipped to succeed academically and holistically. This is value for money in any currency.’

        In terms of the monetary value of Jigsaw, each year group’s resource costs less than 2 days’ supply cover. Can any PSHE teacher plan 36 lessons in less than 2 days and ensure they meet statutory requirements, fit into a spiral curriculum, have summative assessment tasks etc?

        We strive to keep the cost of Jigsaw as affordable as possible for every school.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 contribute to our school’s safeguarding requirements?

        Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, helps to teach students about keeping themselves safe both physically and emotionally, including when using technology. 
         
        All the way through the Jigsaw Programme, students are taught in age- and stage-appropriate ways, about what to say and do if they don’t feel safe in a situation, or if something feels uncomfortable or not right to them, from bullying and unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology. The emphasis is on helping students realise their independence and be responsible for themselves whilst knowing how and where to access advice and support when they need it.
         
        How effective are the school’s / PRU’s policies and procedures for developing children’s understanding and awareness of how to be safe through the teaching and pastoral support offered to learners regarding; Sex and healthy relationships education, Substance and alcohol misuse, Domestic abuse and Sexual violence and exploitation.
         
        Jigsaw has all these elements built into the teaching and learning and there are mapping documents showing exactly which lessons the teaching and learning takes place, enabling individual schools to adapt or expand on any content as they feel is appropriate to support their pupils.
      • How can Jigsaw 11-16 help my school with its Prevent agenda?

        Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, makes a significant contribution toward ensuring that the curriculum and the learning environment that students experience lays down a grounding in which the ideological and emotional roots of extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours cannot flourish.

        This contribution emerges first and foremost through the underpinning philosophy of the Jigsaw Programme and the learning styles it advocates, but also through many aspects of the specific content of the themes or ‘Puzzles’ that make up the Programme.

        Students are taught and empowered to know their own minds, to operate from a position of self-awareness, mindfulness and self-valuing, and to develop the capacity to empathise with others as well as to think with discernment.

      • If we use Jigsaw 11-16, will we meet the requirements for statutory Relationships and Sexuality Education 2021?

        Both the content and the approach of Jigsaw means that schools delivering their PSHE though the Jigsaw Programme will fully meet the Curriculum for Wales – Relationships and Sexuality Education Code requirements, subject of course, to schools delivering the scheme with fidelity.

        Jigsaw also provides detailed mapping documents showing exactly where each of the statutory statements is taught in the programme, so that schools can see where they can adapt or extend any of this content further to meet any specific needs for their school community.

        Furthermore, we will always respond to any further guidance from the Welsh Government and Estyn and update our materials where necessary.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 support the latest Estyn requirements?

        Jigsaw supports schools specifically in 3 out of the 5 areas of the key areas that Estyn identifies in it’s 2022 school inspections guidance:
        • Wellbeing and attitudes to learning
        • Teaching and learning experiences
        • Care, support and guidance
        Our documents on the Community Area show in more detail how Jigsaw 11-16 can significantly contribute to an appositive Estyn report.
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 help students prepare for further study or work-life?

        Employability Skills are a key feature throughout Jigsaw, sometimes explicitly described as such, sometimes more implicit in lessons. Each Puzzle (unit) includes a lesson where the activities lend themselves to providing students with evidence of their personal development through activities in a Jigsaw Workbook.

        For students to gain the most from the Jigsaw Programme, they must have the chance to experience the full lesson (Learning Pod, the Big Bit, Finishing Facts and the Signpost) to make best use of the opportunity to develop the skills that will prove valuable as they continue their career journey.

        There are numerous lessons in every year group that explore the world of work and further study, most of which appear in the Dreams & Goals and Being Me in My World Puzzles (units).

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 represent value for money?

        The Jigsaw PSHE programme provides well-researched lessons covering essential areas in a student’s life development. It helps them build self-esteem and resilience while encouraging them to recognise their own strengths.

        This process will enable them to make healthy and positive decisions in their lives. Looking after the mental and physical health of students is a major focus for this Programme; a student who is able to develop strategies to deal with teenage life will be more equipped to succeed academically and holistically. This is value for money in any currency.’

        In terms of the monetary value of Jigsaw, each year group’s resource costs less than 2 days’ supply cover. Can any PSHE teacher plan 36 lessons in less than 2 days and ensure they meet statutory requirements, fit into a spiral curriculum, have summative assessment tasks etc?

        We strive to keep the cost of Jigsaw as affordable as possible for every school.

    • Common Secondary Subject Leader Questions

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 ensure that my students are learning everything they need in PSHE?

        Jigsaw 11-16 builds on the Jigsaw 3-11 Programme, offering a holistic PSHE learning journey spanning the pupil’s school career, with a progressive, spiral curriculum that addresses real needs in a rapidly changing world.

        Jigsaw pledges to always cover all aspects of PSHE required by the DfE regarding statutory status on RSE and Health Education, to position these aspects within its holistic whole-school approach to PSHE, and to contribute significantly to the 2019 Ofsted framework, especially to behaviour and Attitudes and Personal Development.

        Every aspect of the PSHE Association’s programme of study (2020) is covered in Jigsaw. The mapping documents (which are in the Jigsaw 11-16 website Community Area, once you have purchased Jigsaw 11-16) state clearly how Jigsaw covers the outcomes in the Programme of Study, as well as how Jigsaw places a lot of emphasis on emotional literacy and personal development, more than is suggested in the Programme of Study.

        The Jigsaw snapshot, supplied in the Materials (Launch Pack) and downloadable with Inspection materials, shows a brief overview of the content covered in Jigsaw and the documents relating to Ofsted and statutory status guidance give more detail as to Jigsaw’s coverage.

        That said, we believe it is vitally important for teachers to tailor their delivery of Jigsaw 11-16 to the needs of their students and there is flexibility built into the jigsaw Programmes to allow this to happen.

        The Jigsaw team are constantly monitoring the changing world of PSHE and Health & Well-being coverage and anything new which appears in the curriculum is quickly addressed through the supportive Community Area.

      • My PSHE teaching colleagues aren’t specialists. Does that matter and can we still use Jigsaw 11-16?

        Jigsaw 11-16 was co-produced with teachers and students in 30+ schools over 2 years to ensure it works for all teachers. It does not matter if they are specialists or not, as Jigsaw 11-16 has been written with the needs of non-specialists in mind.

        The detailed and flexible lesson plans (including all teaching resources) can be adapted according to the structure of the timetable and also model best practice, regardless of who is teaching the lessons.

        The lesson plan is a brief summary with the lesson itself being structured and delivered through a detailed slide show presentation with teacher notes provided and activities and assessment resources included for printing when necessary. This means preparation time is kept to a minimum, allowing teachers to use their time to tailor and differentiate the lessons rather than planning them from scratch and searching for teaching resources.

        We believe Jigsaw PSHE lessons are examples of good practice while enabling teaching staff to use their professional judgement and creativity to best meet the needs of students. Teachers are, of course, free to add to the lesson plans and resources to suit students and staff, whilst maintaining the fidelity of the Jigsaw Programme.

        In order for the Jigsaw Programme to have the most positive impact in school, it is important that teachers adhere to the philosophy and structure of the programme. Whilst there is room for flexibility in the structure (as you will have seen in the way the lessons are planned), and it is vital to meet student needs, it is crucial that teachers use the tried-and-tested methods and ideas so they can note real impact.

        We have produced lesson plans that can be used in a range of settings and using a variety of teaching models to suit all needs, and carefully considered how learning happens and the structures necessary to optimise this.

      • How is Jigsaw 11-16 structured?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme includes six units of study (Puzzles), each with six lessons (Pieces), for each year group in Years 7-10, and currently 4 units, each with 6 lessons for Year 11, to allow for the usual restricted teaching time in Year 11 due to exams.
         
        The Puzzles progress through the academic year, in the following sequence:
        • Being Me in My World (BM)
        • Celebrating Difference (CD)
        • Dreams and Goals (DG)
        • Healthy Me (HM)
        • Relationships (RL)
        • Changing Me (CM)
         
        The lesson plans are thoughtfully structured to enhance and maximise both focus and learning potential, are logical and become quickly familiar with students. The exact structure and rationale can be seen in the following section, from the Inspection Materials and is explained in more detail in the Jigsaw Approach document.
      • How do the lessons actually work for teachers?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 programme is flexible and can be adapted easily to suit most teaching styles and PSHE curriculum arrangements. To make this as simple to adapt as possible, the Jigsaw 11-16 lesson structure is split into four parts.
         
        Assuming a full 4-part lesson needs an hour’s teaching time:
        •  Learning Pod, where students focus on the essence of the lesson (approx. 15-20 minutes);
        •  Big Bit, which builds upon and develops that which is in the Learning Pod (approx. 30-35 minutes);
        •  Finishing Facts (conclusion) (approx. 2-3 minutes) and
        •  Signpost (approx. 2 minutes).
         
        There are also two distinct lesson combinations depending on teaching time available:
        1.  Learning Pod + Finishing Facts + Signpost
        2.  Learning Pod + Big Bit + Finishing Facts + Signpost
         
        The lessons can be taught weekly OR as the components for a drop-down/off-timetable day (Jigsaw believes PSHE is usually more effective when delivered in a regular time-tabled teaching slot so learning can be built over time).
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 support students outside school?

        Jigsaw 11-16 is a universal programme and will be relevant to most students. If students require more input on a specific topic, the school setting will need to provide or suggest targeted support services appropriate to need.

        In addition to this, Jigsaw 11-16 can help by signalling further information and, as such, each lesson ends with signposting: the final slide of each lesson features links to useful websites that are relevant to the messages of the lesson. Please feel free to provide students with your own list of additional websites and/or services available in your local area.

        The issues covered in Jigsaw lessons may well lead to discussions which disclose or hint at students’ needs that should be addressed and referred into the pastoral system.

      • How will I know if Jigsaw 11-16 is working? Is there an assessment process?

        Statutory RSHE guidance (England 2019) makes it clear that governors have the responsibility to ensure students make progress in their learning in this subject area.
         
        At Jigsaw, we believe this subject is fundamental to young people’s personal development and their learning, so of course we need to assess learning and evaluate teacher performance. However, we need to do this in as non-burdensome way as possible.
         
        Starting where students are is vital, so the Learning Pod exercises give opportunities to observe starting points. Jigsaw encourages self-reflection towards the end of each lesson and includes a “workbook” of summative assessment tasks in Piece (Lesson) 6 of each Puzzle.
         
        The “workbook” could be completed as a whole (in Piece 6) or could be divided up and activities given during appropriate lessons through the Puzzle.
         
        All workbooks from all the Puzzles in each Year Group are collated into one workbook per year group and these are free to download from the Jigsaw 11-16 Materials section under the ‘Whole School’ tile (or in the Community Area for legacy schools), thus providing an ongoing annual record of each student’s learning for the year.
         
        These workbooks also provide the assessment process needed to meet the Learning Objectives for the NCFE (Northern Council for Further Education) Levels 1 and 2 Awards in Relationships, Sex and Health Education (see www.ncfe.org.uk for more details).
         
        Whilst we agree that much significant learning happens without the need for writing it down, we also believe it is important to value the learning journey of each student. 
         
        In this regard we suggest each student keeps a Jigsaw Journal, harvesting learning experiences and creating a portfolio. Jigsaw Journal covers are available on the Jigsaw 11-16 Materials section under the ‘Whole School’ tile providing an inexpensive way to create such portfolios by sticking the Journal cover to the front of a scrapbook or exercise book.
         
        More information and support materials, including training materials, editable sample policy etc are also available in the Jigsaw 11-16 Community Area.
      • Can Jigsaw help my students to gain external accreditation in PSHE?

        igsaw works in partnership with NCFE (Northern Council for Further Education) which offer Levels 1 and 2 Awards in RSHE (Relationships, Sex and Health Education).
         
        The Learning Objectives in these Awards cover all the statutory RSHE outcomes (DfE England 2019) but also have a wider reach reflecting a whole-school PSHE programme.
         
        Jigsaw PSHE 11-16 is endorsed by NCFE as being in complete alignment with the Awards. Following the Jigsaw Programme means all the necessary learning content will be covered in the same order as the Awards’ Learning Objectives are sequenced. The assessment ‘Workbooks’ in lesson 6 of each Jigsaw unit can be used to evidence learning aligned to the NCFE Awards’ criteria, meaning no additional assessment processes are needed to gain students the Awards.
         
        For further information www.ncfe.org.uk
      • Why does each lesson start with a short mindfulness practice?

        We believe mindfulness practice has significant benefits to mental health, self-esteem and the capacity to learn.

        Supported by many years’ experience in teaching and psychotherapy, and through seeing the tangible positive impact this makes on children experiencing Jigsaw 3-11, the practice of mindfulness, even just a few minutes each Jigsaw lesson, can have real benefits.

        Students learn to become aware of their thought processes and emotional states in the present moment without judgement, and the ability to do this needs to be practised regularly.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness philosophy. This aims to empower students to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives.

        It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.

        Feedback from schools has shown that although students are unused to the practice at first, they soon see the value of it and willingly use the techniques to help them in other areas of their learning as well as in life outside school, having significant positive impact on learning and mental health.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 offer any training?

        Yes, we do.
         
        The Jigsaw Consultants are all experienced teachers and trainers and can provide live online or face-to-face training in your school on the Jigsaw 11-16 resources (including twilight, half day or full day sessions). Pricing depends on your specific requirement and the method of delivery, online (remotely) or face-to-face (on site).
         
        We also provide RSE training, to equip staff with the knowledge, skills and competence to deliver high-quality RSE lessons using the Jigsaw programme.
         
        Find out about our optional add-on training opportunities by contacting our friendly customer service team.
      • How much does it cost to have Jigsaw 11-16 in my school?

        The overall price depends on how many year groups you need to fit your school and regional structure.

        For full pricing information on Jigsaw 11-16 click here.

      • Once I have ordered Jigsaw 11-16, how long does it take before I can start using it?

        When you have placed your order, we will issue you with your login details as soon as possible. So, usually within 2 working days you will have access to the materials.

        We encourage you to read through the ‘Getting Started’ section and explore the training materials in the Community Area of the website before you start using any of the resources. There is a lot of useful information available on the website to help get Jigsaw 11-16 off to a positive start across your school.

      • How do I set up Jigsaw 11-16 in my school so that it is successful?

        Once you receive your resources, you will be sent several documents, which will help you set up Jigsaw 11-16 in your school and fulfil student and staff needs.
         
        Follow the instructions in the Launch Pack and contact the Jigsaw team if you have any further questions. You and your teaching colleagues will always have access to a Jigsaw mentor to help you if you have any questions about the teaching materials or supporting documents.
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 ensure that my students are learning everything they need in PSHE?

        Jigsaw 11-16 builds on the Jigsaw 3-11 Programme, offering a holistic PSHE learning journey spanning the pupil’s school career, with a progressive, spiral curriculum that addresses real needs in a rapidly changing world.

        Jigsaw contributes significantly to all four areas of focus of the CIS Accreditation framework, particularly (but not exclusively) in the domains of: Purpose and direction, The Curriculum, Teaching and Assessing, and Well-being.

        The expectations set out in the Wellbeing domain are extensively covered through Jigsaw’s spiral curriculum and we have clear mapping documents enabling schools to clearly see how and where each of the mileposts is taught within the programme.

        The Jigsaw snapshot, supplied in the Materials (Launch Pack) and downloadable with Inspection materials, shows a brief overview of the content covered in Jigsaw and the documents relating to Ofsted and statutory status guidance give more detail as to Jigsaw’s coverage.

        That said, we believe it is vitally important for teachers to tailor their delivery of Jigsaw 11-16 to the needs of their students and there is flexibility built into the jigsaw Programmes to allow this to happen.

        The Jigsaw team are constantly monitoring the changing world of PSHE and Health & Well-being coverage and anything new which appears in the curriculum is quickly addressed through the supportive Community Area.

      • My PSHE teaching colleagues aren’t specialists. Does that matter and can we still use Jigsaw 11-16?

        Jigsaw 11-16 was co-produced with teachers and students in 30+ schools over 2 years to ensure it works for all teachers. It does not matter if they are specialists or not, as Jigsaw 11-16 has been written with the needs of non-specialists in mind.

        The detailed and flexible lesson plans (including all teaching resources) can be adapted according to the structure of the timetable and also model best practice, regardless of who is teaching the lessons.

        The lesson plan is a brief summary with the lesson itself being structured and delivered through a detailed slide show presentation with teacher notes provided and activities and assessment resources included for printing when necessary. This means preparation time is kept to a minimum, allowing teachers to use their time to tailor and differentiate the lessons rather than planning them from scratch and searching for teaching resources.

        We believe Jigsaw PSHE lessons are examples of good practice while enabling teaching staff to use their professional judgement and creativity to best meet the needs of students. Teachers are, of course, free to add to the lesson plans and resources to suit students and staff, whilst maintaining the fidelity of the Jigsaw Programme.

        In order for the Jigsaw Programme to have the most positive impact in school, it is important that teachers adhere to the philosophy and structure of the programme. Whilst there is room for flexibility in the structure (as you will have seen in the way the lessons are planned), and it is vital to meet student needs, it is crucial that teachers use the tried-and-tested methods and ideas so they can note real impact.

        We have produced lesson plans that can be used in a range of settings and using a variety of teaching models to suit all needs, and carefully considered how learning happens and the structures necessary to optimise this.

      • How is Jigsaw 11-16 structured?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme includes six units of study (Puzzles), each with six lessons (Pieces), for each year group in Years 7-10, and currently 4 units, each with 6 lessons for Year 11, to allow for the usual restricted teaching time in Year 11 due to exams.
         
        The Puzzles progress through the academic year, in the following sequence:
        • Being Me in My World (BM)
        • Celebrating Difference (CD)
        • Dreams and Goals (DG)
        • Healthy Me (HM)
        • Relationships (RL)
        • Changing Me (CM)
         
        The lesson plans are thoughtfully structured to enhance and maximise both focus and learning potential, are logical and become quickly familiar with students. The exact structure and rationale can be seen in the following section, from the Inspection Materials and is explained in more detail in the Jigsaw Approach document.
      • How do the lessons actually work for teachers?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 programme is flexible and can be adapted easily to suit most teaching styles and PSHE curriculum arrangements. To make this as simple to adapt as possible, the Jigsaw 11-16 lesson structure is split into four parts.
         
        Assuming a full 4-part lesson needs an hour’s teaching time:
        •  Learning Pod, where students focus on the essence of the lesson (approx. 15-20 minutes);
        •  Big Bit, which builds upon and develops that which is in the Learning Pod (approx. 30-35 minutes);
        •  Finishing Facts (conclusion) (approx. 2-3 minutes) and
        •  Signpost (approx. 2 minutes).
         
        There are also two distinct lesson combinations depending on teaching time available:
        1.  Learning Pod + Finishing Facts + Signpost
        2.  Learning Pod + Big Bit + Finishing Facts + Signpost
         
        The lessons can be taught weekly OR as the components for a drop-down/off-timetable day (Jigsaw believes PSHE is usually more effective when delivered in a regular time-tabled teaching slot so learning can be built over time).
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 support students outside school?

        Jigsaw 11-16 is a universal programme and will be relevant to most students. If students require more input on a specific topic, the school setting will need to provide or suggest targeted support services appropriate to need.

        In addition to this, Jigsaw 11-16 can help by signalling further information and, as such, each lesson ends with signposting: the final slide of each lesson features links to useful websites that are relevant to the messages of the lesson. Please feel free to provide students with your own list of additional websites and/or services available in your local area.

        The issues covered in Jigsaw lessons may well lead to discussions which disclose or hint at students’ needs that should be addressed and referred into the pastoral system.

      • How will I know if Jigsaw 11-16 is working? Is there an assessment process?

        At Jigsaw, we believe this subject is fundamental to young people’s personal development and their learning, so of course we need to assess learning and evaluate teacher performance. However, we need to do this in as non-burdensome way as possible.
         
        Starting where students are is vital, so the Learning Pod exercises give opportunities to observe starting points. Jigsaw encourages self-reflection towards the end of each lesson and includes a “workbook” of summative assessment tasks in Piece (Lesson) 6 of each Puzzle.
         
        The “workbook” could be completed as a whole (in Piece 6) or could be divided up and activities given during appropriate lessons through the Puzzle.
         
        All workbooks from all the Puzzles in each Year Group are collated into one workbook per year group and these are free to download from the Jigsaw 11-16 Materials section under the ‘Whole School’ tile (or in the Community Area for legacy schools), thus providing an ongoing annual record of each student’s learning for the year.
         
        These workbooks also provide the assessment process needed to meet the Learning Objectives for the NCFE (Northern Council for Further Education) Levels 1 and 2 Awards in Relationships, Sex and Health Education (see www.ncfe.org.uk for more details).
         
        Whilst we agree that much significant learning happens without the need for writing it down, we also believe it is important to value the learning journey of each student. 
         
        In this regard we suggest each student keeps a Jigsaw Journal, harvesting learning experiences and creating a portfolio. Jigsaw Journal covers are available on the Jigsaw 11-16 Materials section under the ‘Whole School’ tile providing an inexpensive way to create such portfolios by sticking the Journal cover to the front of a scrapbook or exercise book.
         
        More information and support materials, including training materials, editable sample policy etc are also available in the Jigsaw 11-16 Community Area.
      • Can Jigsaw help my students to gain external accreditation in PSHE?

        igsaw works in partnership with NCFE (Northern Council for Further Education) which offer Levels 1 and 2 Awards in RSHE (Relationships, Sex and Health Education).
         
        The Learning Objectives in these Awards cover all the statutory RSHE outcomes (DfE England 2019) but also have a wider reach reflecting a whole-school PSHE programme.
         
        Jigsaw PSHE 11-16 is endorsed by NCFE as being in complete alignment with the Awards. Following the Jigsaw Programme means all the necessary learning content will be covered in the same order as the Awards’ Learning Objectives are sequenced. The assessment ‘Workbooks’ in lesson 6 of each Jigsaw unit can be used to evidence learning aligned to the NCFE Awards’ criteria, meaning no additional assessment processes are needed to gain students the Awards.
         
        For further information www.ncfe.org.uk
      • Why does each lesson start with a short mindfulness practice?

        We believe mindfulness practice has significant benefits to mental health, self-esteem and the capacity to learn.

        Supported by many years’ experience in teaching and psychotherapy, and through seeing the tangible positive impact this makes on children experiencing Jigsaw 3-11, the practice of mindfulness, even just a few minutes each Jigsaw lesson, can have real benefits.

        Students learn to become aware of their thought processes and emotional states in the present moment without judgement, and the ability to do this needs to be practised regularly.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness philosophy. This aims to empower students to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives.

        It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.
        Feedback from schools has shown that although students are unused to the practice at first, they soon see the value of it and willingly use the techniques to help them in other areas of their learning as well as in life outside school, having significant positive impact on learning and mental health.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 offer any training?

        es, we do.
         
        The Jigsaw Consultants are all experienced teachers and trainers and can provide live online or face-to-face training in your school on the Jigsaw 11-16 resources (including twilight, half day or full day sessions). Pricing depends on your specific requirement and the method of delivery, online (remotely) or face-to-face (on site).
         
        We also provide RSE training, to equip staff with the knowledge, skills and competence to deliver high-quality RSE lessons using the Jigsaw programme.
         
        Find out about our optional add-on training opportunities by contacting our friendly customer service team.
      • How much does it cost to have Jigsaw 11-16 in my school?

        The overall price depends on how many year groups you need to fit your school and regional structure.

        For full pricing information on Jigsaw 11-16 click here.

      • Once I have ordered Jigsaw 11-16, how long does it take before I can start using it?

        When you have placed your order, we will issue you with your login details as soon as possible. So, usually within 2 working days you will have access to the materials.

        We encourage you to read through the ‘Getting Started’ section and explore the training materials in the Community Area of the website before you start using any of the resources. There is a lot of useful information available on the website to help get Jigsaw 11-16 off to a positive start across your school.

      • How do I set up Jigsaw 11-16 in my school so that it is successful?

        Once you receive your resources, you will be sent several documents, which will help you set up Jigsaw 11-16 in your school and fulfil student and staff needs.
         
        Follow the instructions in the Launch Pack and contact the Jigsaw team if you have any further questions. You and your teaching colleagues will always have access to a Jigsaw mentor to help you if you have any questions about the teaching materials or supporting documents.
      • My PSHE teaching colleagues aren’t specialists. Does that matter and can we still use Jigsaw 11-16?

        Jigsaw 11-16 was co-produced with teachers and students in 30+ schools over 2 years to ensure it works for all teachers. It does not matter if they are specialists or not, as Jigsaw 11-16 has been written with the needs of non-specialists in mind.

        The detailed and flexible lesson plans (including all teaching resources) can be adapted according to the structure of the timetable and also model best practice, regardless of who is teaching the lessons.

        The lesson plan is a brief summary with the lesson itself being structured and delivered through a detailed slide show presentation with teacher notes provided and activities and assessment resources included for printing when necessary. This means preparation time is kept to a minimum, allowing teachers to use their time to tailor and differentiate the lessons rather than planning them from scratch and searching for teaching resources.

        We believe Jigsaw PSHE lessons are examples of good practice while enabling teaching staff to use their professional judgement and creativity to best meet the needs of students. Teachers are, of course, free to add to the lesson plans and resources to suit students and staff, whilst maintaining the fidelity of the Jigsaw Programme.

        In order for the Jigsaw Programme to have the most positive impact in school, it is important that teachers adhere to the philosophy and structure of the programme. Whilst there is room for flexibility in the structure (as you will have seen in the way the lessons are planned), and it is vital to meet student needs, it is crucial that teachers use the tried-and-tested methods and ideas so they can note real impact.

        We have produced lesson plans that can be used in a range of settings and using a variety of teaching models to suit all needs, and carefully considered how learning happens and the structures necessary to optimise this.

      • How is Jigsaw 11-16 structured?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme includes six units of study (Puzzles), each with six lessons (Pieces), for each year group in Years 7-10, and currently 4 units, each with 6 lessons for Year 11, to allow for the usual restricted teaching time in Year 11 due to exams.
         
        The Puzzles progress through the academic year, in the following sequence:
        • Being Me in My World (BM)
        • Celebrating Difference (CD)
        • Dreams and Goals (DG)
        • Healthy Me (HM)
        • Relationships (RL)
        • Changing Me (CM)
         
        The lesson plans are thoughtfully structured to enhance and maximise both focus and learning potential, are logical and become quickly familiar with students. The exact structure and rationale can be seen in the following section, from the Inspection Materials and is explained in more detail in the Jigsaw Approach document.
      • How do the lessons actually work for teachers?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 programme is flexible and can be adapted easily to suit most teaching styles and PSHE curriculum arrangements. To make this as simple to adapt as possible, the Jigsaw 11-16 lesson structure is split into four parts.
         
        Assuming a full 4-part lesson needs an hour’s teaching time:
        •  Learning Pod, where students focus on the essence of the lesson (approx. 15-20 minutes);
        •  Big Bit, which builds upon and develops that which is in the Learning Pod (approx. 30-35 minutes);
        •  Finishing Facts (conclusion) (approx. 2-3 minutes) and
        •  Signpost (approx. 2 minutes).
         
        There are also two distinct lesson combinations depending on teaching time available:
        1.  Learning Pod + Finishing Facts + Signpost
        2.  Learning Pod + Big Bit + Finishing Facts + Signpost
         
        The lessons can be taught weekly OR as the components for a drop-down/off-timetable day (Jigsaw believes PSHE is usually more effective when delivered in a regular time-tabled teaching slot so learning can be built over time).
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 support students outside school?

        Jigsaw 11-16 is a universal programme and will be relevant to most students. If students require more input on a specific topic, the school setting will need to provide or suggest targeted support services appropriate to need.

        In addition to this, Jigsaw 11-16 can help by signalling further information and, as such, each lesson ends with signposting: the final slide of each lesson features links to useful websites that are relevant to the messages of the lesson. Please feel free to provide students with your own list of additional websites and/or services available in your local area.

        The issues covered in Jigsaw lessons may well lead to discussions which disclose or hint at students’ needs that should be addressed and referred into the pastoral system.

      • How will I know if Jigsaw 11-16 is working? Is there an assessment process?

        At Jigsaw, we believe this subject is fundamental to young people’s personal development and their learning, so of course we need to assess learning and evaluate teacher performance. However, we need to do this in as non-burdensome way as possible.
         
        Starting where students are is vital, so the Learning Pod exercises give opportunities to observe starting points. Jigsaw encourages self-reflection towards the end of each lesson and includes a “workbook” of summative assessment tasks in Piece (Lesson) 6 of each Puzzle.
         
        The “workbook” could be completed as a whole (in Piece 6) or could be divided up and activities given during appropriate lessons through the Puzzle.
         
        All workbooks from all the Puzzles in each Year Group are collated into one workbook per year group and these are free to download from the Jigsaw 11-16 Materials section under the ‘Whole School’ tile (or in the Community Area for legacy schools), thus providing an ongoing annual record of each student’s learning for the year.
         
        These workbooks also provide the assessment process needed to meet the Learning Objectives for the NCFE (Northern Council for Further Education) Levels 1 and 2 Awards in Relationships, Sex and Health Education (see www.ncfe.org.uk for more details).
         
        Whilst we agree that much significant learning happens without the need for writing it down, we also believe it is important to value the learning journey of each student. 
         
        In this regard we suggest each student keeps a Jigsaw Journal, harvesting learning experiences and creating a portfolio. Jigsaw Journal covers are available on the Jigsaw 11-16 Materials section under the ‘Whole School’ tile providing an inexpensive way to create such portfolios by sticking the Journal cover to the front of a scrapbook or exercise book.
         
        More information and support materials, including training materials, editable sample policy etc are also available in the Jigsaw 11-16 Community Area.
      • Can Jigsaw help my students to gain external accreditation in PSHE?

        Jigsaw works in partnership with NCFE (Northern Council for Further Education) which offer Levels 1 and 2 Awards in RSHE (Relationships, Sex and Health Education).
         
        The Learning Objectives in these Awards cover all the statutory RSHE outcomes (DfE England 2019) but also have a wider reach reflecting a whole-school PSHE programme.
         
        Jigsaw PSHE 11-16 is endorsed by NCFE as being in complete alignment with the Awards. Following the Jigsaw Programme means all the necessary learning content will be covered in the same order as the Awards’ Learning Objectives are sequenced. The assessment ‘Workbooks’ in lesson 6 of each Jigsaw unit can be used to evidence learning aligned to the NCFE Awards’ criteria, meaning no additional assessment processes are needed to gain students the Awards.
         
        For further information www.ncfe.org.uk
      • Why does each lesson start with a short mindfulness practice?

        We believe mindfulness practice has significant benefits to mental health, self-esteem and the capacity to learn.

        Supported by many years’ experience in teaching and psychotherapy, and through seeing the tangible positive impact this makes on children experiencing Jigsaw 3-11, the practice of mindfulness, even just a few minutes each Jigsaw lesson, can have real benefits.

        Students learn to become aware of their thought processes and emotional states in the present moment without judgement, and the ability to do this needs to be practised regularly.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness philosophy. This aims to empower students to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives.

        It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.

        Feedback from schools has shown that although students are unused to the practice at first, they soon see the value of it and willingly use the techniques to help them in other areas of their learning as well as in life outside school, having significant positive impact on learning and mental health.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 offer any training?

        Yes, we do.
         
        The Jigsaw Consultants are all experienced teachers and trainers and can provide live online or face-to-face training in your school on the Jigsaw 11-16 resources (including twilight, half day or full day sessions). Pricing depends on your specific requirement and the method of delivery, online (remotely) or face-to-face (on site).
         
        We also provide RSE training, to equip staff with the knowledge, skills and competence to deliver high-quality RSE lessons using the Jigsaw programme.
         
        Find out about our optional add-on training opportunities by contacting our friendly customer service team.
         
      • How much does it cost to have Jigsaw 11-16 in my school?

        The overall price depends on how many year groups you need to fit your school and regional structure.

        For full pricing information on Jigsaw 11-16 click here.

      • Once I have ordered Jigsaw 11-16, how long does it take before I can start using it?

        When you have placed your order, we will issue you with your login details as soon as possible. So, usually within 2 working days you will have access to the materials.

        We encourage you to read through the ‘Getting Started’ section and explore the training materials in the Community Area of the website before you start using any of the resources. There is a lot of useful information available on the website to help get Jigsaw 11-16 off to a positive start across your school.

      • How do I set up Jigsaw 11-16 in my school so that it is successful?

        Once you receive your resources, you will be sent several documents, which will help you set up Jigsaw 11-16 in your school and fulfil student and staff needs.
         
        Follow the instructions in the Launch Pack and contact the Jigsaw team if you have any further questions. You and your teaching colleagues will always have access to a Jigsaw mentor to help you if you have any questions about the teaching materials or supporting documents,
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 ensure that my students are learning everything they need in PSHE?

        Jigsaw 11-16 builds on the Jigsaw 3-12 Programme, offering a holistic PSHE learning journey spanning the pupil’s school career, with a progressive, spiral curriculum that addresses real needs in a rapidly changing world.

        Every aspect of the PSHE Association’s programme of study (2020) is covered in Jigsaw. The mapping documents (which are in the Jigsaw 11-16 website Community Area, once you have purchased Jigsaw 11-16) state clearly how Jigsaw covers the outcomes in the Programme of Study, as well as how Jigsaw places a lot of emphasis on emotional literacy and personal development, more than is suggested in the Programme of Study.

        The Jigsaw snapshot, supplied in the Materials (Launch Pack) and downloadable with Inspection materials, shows a brief overview of the content covered in Jigsaw and the documents relating to Ofsted and statutory status guidance give more detail as to Jigsaw’s coverage.

        That said, we believe it is vitally important for teachers to tailor their delivery of Jigsaw 11-16 to the needs of their students and there is flexibility built into the jigsaw Programmes to allow this to happen.

        The Jigsaw team are constantly monitoring the changing world of PSHE and Health & Well-being coverage and anything new which appears in the curriculum is quickly addressed through the supportive Community Area.

      • Do we have to buy the whole programme as Scottish secondary pupils start at age 12?

        No – Jigsaw 11-16 has been written to meet the teaching and learning needs in many different types of schools, and schools only need to buy the resources for the pupils in their school.

      • My PSHE teaching colleagues aren’t specialists. Does that matter and can we still use Jigsaw 11-16?

        Jigsaw 11-16 was co-produced with teachers and students in 30+ schools over 2 years to ensure it works for all teachers. It does not matter if they are specialists or not, as Jigsaw 11-16 has been written with the needs of non-specialists in mind.

        The detailed and flexible lesson plans (including all teaching resources) can be adapted according to the structure of the timetable and also model best practice, regardless of who is teaching the lessons.

        The lesson plan is a brief summary with the lesson itself being structured and delivered through a detailed slide show presentation with teacher notes provided and activities and assessment resources included for printing when necessary. This means preparation time is kept to a minimum, allowing teachers to use their time to tailor and differentiate the lessons rather than planning them from scratch and searching for teaching resources.

        We believe Jigsaw PSHE lessons are examples of good practice while enabling teaching staff to use their professional judgement and creativity to best meet the needs of students. Teachers are, of course, free to add to the lesson plans and resources to suit students and staff, whilst maintaining the fidelity of the Jigsaw Programme.

        In order for the Jigsaw Programme to have the most positive impact in school, it is important that teachers adhere to the philosophy and structure of the programme. Whilst there is room for flexibility in the structure (as you will have seen in the way the lessons are planned), and it is vital to meet student needs, it is crucial that teachers use the tried-and-tested methods and ideas so they can note real impact.

        We have produced lesson plans that can be used in a range of settings and using a variety of teaching models to suit all needs, and carefully considered how learning happens and the structures necessary to optimise this.

      • How is Jigsaw 11-16 structured?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme includes six units of study (Puzzles), each with six lessons (Pieces), for each year group in Years 7-10, and currently 4 units, each with 6 lessons for Year 11, to allow for the usual restricted teaching time in Year 11 due to exams.
         
        The Puzzles progress through the academic year, in the following sequence:
        • Being Me in My World (BM)
        • Celebrating Difference (CD)
        • Dreams and Goals (DG)
        • Healthy Me (HM)
        • Relationships (RL)
        • Changing Me (CM)
         
        The lesson plans are thoughtfully structured to enhance and maximise both focus and learning potential, are logical and become quickly familiar with students. The exact structure and rationale can be seen in the following section, from the Inspection Materials and is explained in more detail in the Jigsaw Approach document.
      • How do the lessons actually work for teachers?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 programme is flexible and can be adapted easily to suit most teaching styles and PSHE curriculum arrangements. To make this as simple to adapt as possible, the Jigsaw 11-16 lesson structure is split into four parts.
         
        Assuming a full 4-part lesson needs an hour’s teaching time:
        •  Learning Pod, where students focus on the essence of the lesson (approx. 15-20 minutes);
        •  Big Bit, which builds upon and develops that which is in the Learning Pod (approx. 30-35 minutes);
        •  Finishing Facts (conclusion) (approx. 2-3 minutes) and
        •  Signpost (approx. 2 minutes).
         
        There are also two distinct lesson combinations depending on teaching time available:
        1.  Learning Pod + Finishing Facts + Signpost
        2.  Learning Pod + Big Bit + Finishing Facts + Signpost
         
        The lessons can be taught weekly OR as the components for a drop-down/off-timetable day (Jigsaw believes PSHE is usually more effective when delivered in a regular time-tabled teaching slot so learning can be built over time).
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 support students outside school?

        Jigsaw 11-16 is a universal programme and will be relevant to most students. If students require more input on a specific topic, the school setting will need to provide or suggest targeted support services appropriate to need.

        In addition to this, Jigsaw 11-16 can help by signalling further information and, as such, each lesson ends with signposting: the final slide of each lesson features links to useful websites that are relevant to the messages of the lesson. Please feel free to provide students with your own list of additional websites and/or services available in your local area.

        The issues covered in Jigsaw lessons may well lead to discussions which disclose or hint at students’ needs that should be addressed and referred into the pastoral system.

      • How will I know if Jigsaw 11-16 is working? Is there an assessment process?

        At Jigsaw, we believe this subject is fundamental to young people’s personal development and their learning, so of course we need to assess learning and evaluate teacher performance. However, we need to do this in as non-burdensome way as possible.
         
        Starting where students are is vital, so the Learning Pod exercises give opportunities to observe starting points. Jigsaw encourages self-reflection towards the end of each lesson and includes a “workbook” of summative assessment tasks in Piece (Lesson) 6 of each Puzzle.
         
        The “workbook” could be completed as a whole (in Piece 6) or could be divided up and activities given during appropriate lessons through the Puzzle.
         
        All workbooks from all the Puzzles in each Year Group are collated into one workbook per year group and these are free to download from the Jigsaw 11-16 Materials section under the ‘Whole School’ tile (or in the Community Area for legacy schools), thus providing an ongoing annual record of each student’s learning for the year.
         
        These workbooks also provide the assessment process needed to meet the Learning Objectives for the NCFE (Northern Council for Further Education) Levels 1 and 2 Awards in Relationships, Sex and Health Education (see www.ncfe.org.uk for more details).
         
        Whilst we agree that much significant learning happens without the need for writing it down, we also believe it is important to value the learning journey of each student. 
         
        In this regard we suggest each student keeps a Jigsaw Journal, harvesting learning experiences and creating a portfolio. Jigsaw Journal covers are available on the Jigsaw 11-16 Materials section under the ‘Whole School’ tile providing an inexpensive way to create such portfolios by sticking the Journal cover to the front of a scrapbook or exercise book.
         
        More information and support materials, including training materials, editable sample policy etc are also available in the Jigsaw 11-16 Community Area.
      • Can Jigsaw help my students to gain external accreditation in PSHE?

        Jigsaw works in partnership with NCFE (Northern Council for Further Education) which offer Levels 1 and 2 Awards in RSHE (Relationships, Sex and Health Education).
         
        The Learning Objectives in these Awards cover all the statutory RSHE outcomes (DfE England 2019) but also have a wider reach reflecting a whole-school PSHE programme.
         
        Jigsaw PSHE 11-16 is endorsed by NCFE as being in complete alignment with the Awards. Following the Jigsaw Programme means all the necessary learning content will be covered in the same order as the Awards’ Learning Objectives are sequenced. The assessment ‘Workbooks’ in lesson 6 of each Jigsaw unit can be used to evidence learning aligned to the NCFE Awards’ criteria, meaning no additional assessment processes are needed to gain students the Awards.
         
        For further information www.ncfe.org.uk
      • Why does each lesson start with a short mindfulness practice?

        We believe mindfulness practice has significant benefits to mental health, self-esteem and the capacity to learn.

        Supported by many years’ experience in teaching and psychotherapy, and through seeing the tangible positive impact this makes on children experiencing Jigsaw 3-11, the practice of mindfulness, even just a few minutes each Jigsaw lesson, can have real benefits.

        Students learn to become aware of their thought processes and emotional states in the present moment without judgement, and the ability to do this needs to be practised regularly.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness philosophy. This aims to empower students to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives.

        It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.

        Feedback from schools has shown that although students are unused to the practice at first, they soon see the value of it and willingly use the techniques to help them in other areas of their learning as well as in life outside school, having significant positive impact on learning and mental health.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 offer any training?

        Yes, we do.
         
        The Jigsaw Consultants are all experienced teachers and trainers and can provide live online or face-to-face training in your school on the Jigsaw 11-16 resources (including twilight, half day or full day sessions). Pricing depends on your specific requirement and the method of delivery, online (remotely) or face-to-face (on site).
         
        We also provide RSE training, to equip staff with the knowledge, skills and competence to deliver high-quality RSE lessons using the Jigsaw programme.
         
        Find out about our optional add-on training opportunities by contacting our friendly customer service team.
      • How much does it cost to have Jigsaw 11-16 in my school?

        The overall price depends on how many year groups you need to fit your school and regional structure.

        For full pricing information on Jigsaw 11-16 click here.

      • Once I have ordered Jigsaw 11-16, how long does it take before I can start using it?

        When you have placed your order, we will issue you with your login details as soon as possible. So, usually within 2 working days you will have access to the materials.

        We encourage you to read through the ‘Getting Started’ section and explore the training materials in the Community Area of the website before you start using any of the resources. There is a lot of useful information available on the website to help get Jigsaw 11-16 off to a positive start across your school.

      • How do I set up Jigsaw 11-16 in my school so that it is successful?

        Once you receive your resources, you will be sent several documents, which will help you set up Jigsaw 11-16 in your school and fulfil student and staff needs.
         
        Follow the instructions in the Launch Pack and contact the Jigsaw team if you have any further questions. You and your teaching colleagues will always have access to a Jigsaw mentor to help you if you have any questions about the teaching materials or supporting documents.
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 ensure that my students are learning everything they need in PSHE?

        Jigsaw 11-16 builds on the Jigsaw 3-11 Programme, offering a holistic PSHE learning journey spanning the pupil’s school career, with a progressive, spiral curriculum that addresses real needs in a rapidly changing world.
         
        Jigsaw pledges to always cover all aspects of PSHE required by the Welsh Curriculum regarding statutory status on RSE and Health and Wellbeing, to position these aspects within its holistic whole-school approach to PSHE, and to contribute significantly to the 2022 Estyn framework, especially to behaviour and Attitudes and Personal Development.
         
        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been mapped to the  Curriculum for Wales Health and Wellbeing Area of Learning and covers almost all the expectations except where it is already covered in another curriculum area (such as PE). 
         
        We have also mapped all the new Welsh Relationships and Sexuality Education Guidance (2022)  to our 11-16 programme and can see where we meet all these, but we will be double-checking and strengthening certain statements as the curriculum is rolled out. 
      • What will I learn about in Jigsaw 11-16 lessons?

        The Jigsaw snapshot shows a brief overview of the content covered in Jigsaw and then the documents relating to the HWB and RSE map exactly where these expectations are met across the whole programme.

        That said, we believe it is vitally important for teachers to tailor their delivery of Jigsaw 11-16 to the needs of their students and there is flexibility built into the jigsaw Programmes to allow this to happen.

        The Jigsaw team are constantly monitoring the changing world of PSHE and Health & Well-being coverage and anything new which appears in the curriculum is quickly addressed through the supportive Community Area.

      • My PSHE teaching colleagues aren’t specialists. Does that matter and can we still use Jigsaw 11-16?

        Jigsaw 11-16 was co-produced with teachers and students in 30+ schools over 2 years to ensure it works for all teachers. It does not matter if they are specialists or not, as Jigsaw 11-16 has been written with the needs of non-specialists in mind.

        The detailed and flexible lesson plans (including all teaching resources) can be adapted according to the structure of the timetable and also model best practice, regardless of who is teaching the lessons.

        The lesson plan is a brief summary with the lesson itself being structured and delivered through a detailed slide show presentation with teacher notes provided and activities and assessment resources included for printing when necessary. This means preparation time is kept to a minimum, allowing teachers to use their time to tailor and differentiate the lessons rather than planning them from scratch and searching for teaching resources.

        We believe Jigsaw PSHE lessons are examples of good practice while enabling teaching staff to use their professional judgement and creativity to best meet the needs of students. Teachers are, of course, free to add to the lesson plans and resources to suit students and staff, whilst maintaining the fidelity of the Jigsaw Programme.

        In order for the Jigsaw Programme to have the most positive impact in school, it is important that teachers adhere to the philosophy and structure of the programme. Whilst there is room for flexibility in the structure (as you will have seen in the way the lessons are planned), and it is vital to meet student needs, it is crucial that teachers use the tried-and-tested methods and ideas so they can note real impact.

        We have produced lesson plans that can be used in a range of settings and using a variety of teaching models to suit all needs, and carefully considered how learning happens and the structures necessary to optimise this.

      • How is Jigsaw 11-16 structured?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme includes six units of study (Puzzles), each with six lessons (Pieces), for each year group in Years 7-10, and currently 4 units, each with 6 lessons for Year 11, to allow for the usual restricted teaching time in Year 11 due to exams.

        The Puzzles progress through the academic year, in the following sequence:

        Being Me in My World (BM)
        Celebrating Difference (CD)
        Dreams and Goals (DG)
        Healthy Me (HM)
        Relationships (RL)
        Changing Me (CM)

        The lesson plans are thoughtfully structured to enhance and maximise both focus and learning potential, are logical and become quickly familiar with students.

        The exact structure and rationale can be seen in the following section, from the Inspection Materials and is explained in more detail in the Jigsaw Approach document.

      • How do the lessons actually work for teachers?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 programme is flexible and can be adapted easily to suit most teaching styles and PSHE curriculum arrangements. To make this as simple to adapt as possible, the Jigsaw 11-16 lesson structure is split into four parts.
         
        Assuming a full 4-part lesson needs an hour’s teaching time:
        •  Learning Pod, where students focus on the essence of the lesson (approx. 15-20 minutes);
        •  Big Bit, which builds upon and develops that which is in the Learning Pod (approx. 30-35 minutes);
        •  Finishing Facts (conclusion) (approx. 2-3 minutes) and
        •  Signpost (approx. 2 minutes).
        There are also two distinct lesson combinations depending on teaching time available:
        1.  Learning Pod + Finishing Facts + Signpost
        2.  Learning Pod + Big Bit + Finishing Facts + Signpost
        The lessons can be taught weekly OR as the components for a drop-down/off-timetable day (Jigsaw believes PSHE is usually more effective when delivered in a regular time-tabled teaching slot so learning can be built over time).
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 support students outside school?

        Jigsaw 11-16 is a universal programme and will be relevant to most students. If students require more input on a specific topic, the school setting will need to provide or suggest targeted support services appropriate to need.

        In addition to this, Jigsaw 11-16 can help by signalling further information and, as such, each lesson ends with signposting: the final slide of each lesson features links to useful websites that are relevant to the messages of the lesson. Please feel free to provide students with your own list of additional websites and/or services available in your local area.

        The issues covered in Jigsaw lessons may well lead to discussions which disclose or hint at students’ needs that should be addressed and referred into the pastoral system.

      • How will I know if Jigsaw 11-16 is working? Is there an assessment process?

        At Jigsaw, we believe this subject is fundamental to young people’s personal development and their learning, so of course we need to assess learning and evaluate teacher performance. However, we need to do this in as non-burdensome way as possible.
         
        Starting where students are is vital, so the Learning Pod exercises give opportunities to observe starting points. Jigsaw encourages self-reflection towards the end of each lesson and includes a “workbook” of summative assessment tasks in Piece (Lesson) 6 of each Puzzle.
         
        The “workbook” could be completed as a whole (in Piece 6) or could be divided up and activities given during appropriate lessons through the Puzzle.
         
        All workbooks from all the Puzzles in each Year Group are collated into one workbook per year group and these are free to download from the Jigsaw 11-16 Materials section under the ‘Whole School’ tile (or in the Community Area for legacy schools), thus providing an ongoing annual record of each student’s learning for the year.
         
        These workbooks also provide the assessment process needed to meet the Learning Objectives for the NCFE (Northern Council for Further Education) Levels 1 and 2 Awards in Relationships, Sex and Health Education (see www.ncfe.org.uk for more details).
         
        Whilst we agree that much significant learning happens without the need for writing it down, we also believe it is important to value the learning journey of each student. In this regard we suggest each student keeps a Jigsaw Journal, harvesting learning experiences and creating a portfolio. 
         
        Jigsaw Journal covers are available on the Jigsaw 11-16 Materials section under the ‘Whole School’ tile (or in the Community Area for legacy schools) providing an inexpensive way to create such portfolios by sticking the Journal cover to the front of a scrapbook or exercise book.
         
        More information and support materials, including training materials, editable sample policy etc are also available in the Jigsaw 11-16 Community Area.
      • Can Jigsaw help my students to gain external accreditation in PSHE?

        Jigsaw works in partnership with NCFE (Northern Council for Further Education) which offer Levels 1 and 2 Awards in RSHE (Relationships, Sex and Health Education).
         
        The Learning Objectives in these Awards cover have a wide reach reflecting a whole-school PSHE programme.
         
        Jigsaw PSHE 11-16 is endorsed by NCFE as being in complete alignment with the Awards. Following the Jigsaw Programme means all the necessary learning content will be covered in the same order as the Awards’ Learning Objectives are sequenced. The assessment ‘Workbooks’ in lesson 6 of each Jigsaw unit can be used to evidence learning aligned to the NCFE Awards’ criteria, meaning no additional assessment processes are needed to gain students the Awards.
         
        For further information www.ncfe.org.uk
      • Why does each lesson start with a short mindfulness practice?

        We believe mindfulness practice has significant benefits to mental health, self-esteem and the capacity to learn.

        Supported by many years’ experience in teaching and psychotherapy, and through seeing the tangible positive impact this makes on children experiencing Jigsaw 3-11, the practice of mindfulness, even just a few minutes each Jigsaw lesson, can have real benefits.

        Students learn to become aware of their thought processes and emotional states in the present moment without judgement, and the ability to do this needs to be practised regularly.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness philosophy. This aims to empower students to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness.

        Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives. It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.

        Feedback from schools has shown that although students are unused to the practice at first, they soon see the value of it and willingly use the techniques to help them in other areas of their learning as well as in life outside school, having significant positive impact on learning and mental health.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 offer any training?

        Yes, we do.
         
        The Jigsaw Consultants are all experienced teachers and trainers and can provide live online or face-to-face training in your school on the Jigsaw 11-16 resources (including twilight, half day or full day sessions). Pricing depends on your specific requirement and the method of delivery, online (remotely) or face-to-face (on site).
         
        We also provide RSE training, to equip staff with the knowledge, skills and competence to deliver high-quality RSE lessons using the Jigsaw programme.
         
        Find out about our optional add-on training opportunities by contacting our friendly team.
      • How much does it cost to have Jigsaw 11-16 in my school?

        The overall price depends on how many year groups you need to fit your school and regional structure.

        For full pricing information on Jigsaw 11-16 click here.

      • Once I have ordered Jigsaw 11-16, how long does it take before I can start using it?

        When you have placed your order, we will issue you with your login details as soon as possible. So, usually within 2 working days you will have access to the materials.

        We encourage you to read through the ‘Getting Started’ section and explore the training materials in the Community Area of the website before you start using any of the resources. There is a lot of useful information available on the website to help get Jigsaw 11-16 off to a positive start across your school.

      • How do I set up Jigsaw 11-16 in my school so that it is successful?

        Once you receive your resources, you will be sent several documents, which will help you set up Jigsaw 11-16 in your school and fulfil student and staff needs.

        Follow the instructions in the Launch Pack and contact the Jigsaw team if you have any further questions.

        You and your teaching colleagues will always have access to a Jigsaw mentor to help you if you have any questions about the teaching materials or supporting documents.

    • Common Secondary Teacher Questions

      • What is featured in the 11-16 Jigsaw resources?

        Our handy Snapshot document shows what is taught in each year group. It also demonstrates progression and the spiral curriculum, with concepts and topics introduced from age 11 and repeated and built upon as students progress through the year groups.
        If you already have Jigsaw 11-16, the Snapshot document is included in your ‘Launch Pack’ which you can download after you log into the Jigsaw 11-16 website.
      • How will Jigsaw 11-16 work in my mixed-ability group?

        The lessons in Jigsaw 11-16 are mindful of many different learning styles, so there will be plenty of opportunities for students to learn in different ways, for example, in groups, individually, in pairs, using different media, and for different purposes.
        To differentiate further it is possible, because all year groups study the same Puzzle (unit) at the same time (but at their own level), to pull up onto your computer screen, the relevant lessons for that unit from different year groups and thereby select learning activities that will best suit your students’ needs/abilities.
        Our 3-11 article on teaching ‘composite classes’ takes this further. The same strategies apply across all the year groups.
      • How is mindfulness developed in Jigsaw 11-16 lessons?

        In Jigsaw PSHE, mindfulness is developed in two ways:
        1. Through the mindfulness practice in each Piece (lesson). This consists of breathing techniques, awareness exercises, and visualisations.
        2. Through the unfolding of mindfulness philosophy within the lessons. For example, this might be explaining how the brain works, how thought-processes happen and the potential consequences of this; it would then explain how the mind can be best used in the context of whatever PSHE content is being covered, for instance, when making decisions about relationships or using alcohol.
        There is a short mindfulness practice script included with each lesson plan for the teacher to read. To make this even easier, there is also an audio file embedded into one of the early slides in every lesson’s slide show presentation. We know this approach is invaluable, so we invite you to try it and encourage your students to persevere and practise this to enable the positive impact it can have.
        We have produced a short video that explains how and why mindfulness is used in Jigsaw lessons, which you will also find in the Community Area. This is to explain to students and staff why there is mindfulness practice in Jigsaw lessons, and may be used to explain the concept to parents/carers too.
      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 teach students about relationships?

        Jigsaw 11-16 contains inclusive Relationship, Sex and Health Education, meeting statutory requirements (DfE 2019 England) within the whole-school Programme. There is a mapping document showing how Jigsaw meets the outcomes, in the Jigsaw Launch Pack, the Inspection Materials and in the schools Community Area.
        One of the six Puzzles (units) in Jigsaw 11-16 is called ‘Relationships’ and is dedicated to exploring the relationships we have with ourselves and with others.
        Indeed, the relationship with self (self-awareness, self-identity, innate qualities and skills of resilience, self-esteem) is the vital starting point, which has an impact on everything else, from decisions regarding health to relationships chosen.
        Positive and successful relationships with others stem from this initial starting point, including others in friendships, family, communities and as a global citizen. Skills of empathy, intimacy, communication, negotiation and conflict-resolution are enabled through the whole of Jigsaw from ages 3 up to 16, as appropriate at different ages and stages of development.
      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 teach students about sex, sexual relationships and sexual health?

        The Jigsaw Sex Education Pieces (lessons) aim to give students their entitlement to information about puberty, human reproduction, sexual health, consent and all aspects in the DfE Guidance, statutory from 2020, and as appropriate to their age and stage of development.
        It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear. We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values.
        There is a strong safeguarding element to this work. The materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit appropriately with the philosophy and ethos of their setting.
        Schools with religious character will obviously need to check their own diocesan/organisation’s advice during this process.
        Sample policy documents have been added to the Community Area of the Jigsaw website to assist schools in updating their policy in line with DfE guidance.
        Note that Jigsaw 11-16 (2nd Edition) fulfils the requirements for statutory Relationships, Sex and Health Education (DfE 2019 England).
      • Are there any lessons in Jigsaw 11-16 on mental health?

        There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, helps students learn about, improve and sustain good mental health, and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health.
        Jigsaw contains lessons explaining mental illness e.g. eating disorders/self-harm etc but chooses also to emphasise how to gain and maintain positive mental health.
        For example, each lesson is represented on a mapping document which states which of the five emotional literacy domains are contributed to, so the purpose of that lesson is clear, in terms of student development and not just their ‘knowledge learning’. This document can be found in the Community area under the ‘Documents’ tile.
        Confidence in oneself, awareness of self-identity and authentic self-esteem – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes difficult for students to develop. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping students to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners.
        Mindfulness philosophy and practice (through which students learn to be aware of their thoughts and feelings in the present moment  – without judgement and to direct their minds to focus on whatever they choose to focus on) is included at the start of each Jigsaw lesson and uses visualisation and breathing techniques. This philosophy is woven through many lessons to enhance student’s understanding and how it assists positively in real-life situations.
        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness and this aims to empower students to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them safely and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives. It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it, allaying and managing stress and anxiety and helping grow gratitude and appreciation, positive psychology towards life.
        The latest guidance recommends that schools need to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learned by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw 3-16 develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every age group.
        A programme like Jigsaw is so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how students learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health, which in turn builds their capacity to learn.
        Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for students and staff, and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values, but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.
      • Our school links PSHE to careers education. Does Jigsaw 11-16 help with this link?

        Jigsaw 11-16 resources can assist schools in their delivery of a robust and meaningful careers strategy. Indeed, the Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers. For all year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be achieved in the future. Equally, the emphasis is on jobs and careers, and deciding on what is important in life.
        The DfE has made use of the eight Benchmarks of good career guidance, developed by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation, to set a standard of excellence, and it is against these benchmarks that Jigsaw 11-16 is mapped.
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 ensure students are learning about their emotional health?

        Jigsaw integrates numerous areas for student development through the entire scheme of learning. These have been mapped across the year groups and across each of the Puzzles (units) to ensure that there is full coverage of development opportunities through the entire scheme – featuring in every Jigsaw Piece (lesson).
        Elements of each Jigsaw lesson will support student development of the emotional literacy domains: self-awareness, social skills, empathy, motivation and managing their feelings.
      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 cover financial education?

        There are numerous opportunities in Jigsaw for teaching and learning about financial capability and economic well-being. The Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.
        For all year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be better in the future. Equally, the emphasis is on jobs and careers, and deciding on what is important in life.
      • What is featured in the 11-16 Jigsaw resources?

        Our handy Snapshot document shows what is taught in each year group. It also demonstrates progression and the spiral curriculum, with concepts and topics introduced from age 11 and repeated and built upon as students progress through the year groups.

        If you already have Jigsaw 11-16, the Snapshot document is included in your ‘Launch Pack’ which you can download after you log into the Jigsaw 11-16 website.

      • How will Jigsaw 11-16 work in my mixed-ability group?

        The lessons in Jigsaw 11-16 are mindful of many different learning styles, so there will be plenty of opportunities for students to learn in different ways, for example, in groups, individually, in pairs, using different media, and for different purposes.

        It is possible to differentiate the materials further because all year groups study the same Puzzle (unit) at the same time (but at their own level).

        This means that you can pull up onto your computer screen, the relevant lessons for that unit from different year groups and thereby select learning activities that will best suit your students’ needs/abilities.

      • How is mindfulness developed in Jigsaw 11-16 lessons?

        In Jigsaw PSHE, mindfulness is developed in two ways:

        Through the mindfulness practice in each Piece (lesson). This consists of breathing techniques, awareness exercises, and visualisations.

        Through the unfolding of mindfulness philosophy within the lessons. For example, this might be explaining how the brain works, how thought-processes happen and the potential consequences of this; it would then explain how the mind can be best used in the context of whatever PSHE content is being covered, for instance, when making decisions about relationships or using alcohol.

        There is a short mindfulness practice script included with each lesson plan for the teacher to read. To make this even easier, there is also an audio file embedded into one of the early slides in every lesson’s slide show presentation. We know this approach is invaluable, so we invite you to try it and encourage your students to persevere and practise this to enable the positive impact it can have.

        We have produced a short video that explains how and why mindfulness is used in Jigsaw lessons, which you will also find in the Community Area. This is to explain to students and staff why there is mindfulness practice in Jigsaw lessons, and may be used to explain the concept to parents/carers too.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 teach students about relationships?

        Jigsaw 11-16 contains inclusive Relationship, Sex and Health Education, within the whole-school Programme. There are clear mapping documents showing where Relationships Education is taught, in the Inspection Materials and of course in the schools Community Area. In this you can see how different aspects of relationships education is included across all six Puzzles.

        One of the six Puzzles (units) in Jigsaw 11-16 is called ‘Relationships’ and is dedicated to exploring the relationships we have with ourselves and with others.

        Indeed, the relationship with self (self-awareness, self-identity, innate qualities and skills of resilience, self-esteem) is the vital starting point, which has an impact on everything else, from decisions regarding health to relationships chosen.

        Positive and successful relationships with others stem from this initial starting point, including others in friendships, family, communities and as a global citizen. Skills of empathy, intimacy, communication, negotiation and conflict-resolution are enabled through the whole of Jigsaw from ages 3 up to 16, as appropriate at different ages and stages of development.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 teach students about sex, sexual relationships and sexual health?

        The Jigsaw Sex Education Pieces (lessons) aim to give students their entitlement to information about puberty, human reproduction, sexual health, consent as appropriate to their age and stage of development.

        It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear. We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values.

        There is a strong safeguarding element to this work. The materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit appropriately with the philosophy and ethos of their setting.

        Schools with religious character will obviously need to check their own diocesan/organisation’s advice during this process.

      • Are there any lessons in Jigsaw 11-16 on mental health?

        There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, helps students learn about, improve and sustain good mental health, and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health.

        Jigsaw contains lessons explaining mental illness e.g. eating disorders/self-harm etc but chooses also to emphasise how to gain and maintain positive mental health.

        For example, each lesson is represented on a mapping document which states which of the five emotional literacy domains are contributed to, so the purpose of that lesson is clear, in terms of student development and not just their ‘knowledge learning’. This document can be found in the Community area under the ‘Documents’ tile.

        Confidence in oneself, awareness of self-identity and authentic self-esteem – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes difficult for students to develop. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping students to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners.

        Mindfulness philosophy and practice (through which students learn to be aware of their thoughts and feelings in the present moment – without judgement and to direct their minds to focus on whatever they choose to focus on) is included at the start of each Jigsaw lesson and uses visualisation and breathing techniques.

        This philosophy is woven through many lessons to enhance student’s understanding and how it assists positively in real-life situations.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness and this aims to empower students to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them safely and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives.

        It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it, allaying and managing stress and anxiety and helping grow gratitude and appreciation, a positive psychology towards life.

        The latest guidance recommends that schools need to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learned by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw 3-16 develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every age group.

        A programme like Jigsaw is so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how students learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health, which in turn builds their capacity to learn.

        Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for students and staff, and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values, but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.

      • Our school links PSHE to careers education. Does Jigsaw 11-16 help with this link?

        Jigsaw 11-16 resources can assist schools in their delivery of a robust and meaningful careers strategy. Indeed, the Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

        For all year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be achieved in the future. Equally, the emphasis is on jobs and careers, and deciding on what is important in life.

        The Gatsby Charitable Foundation has developed eight Benchmarks of good career guidance to set a standard of excellence, and it is against these that Jigsaw 11-16 is mapped.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 ensure students are learning about their emotional health?

        Jigsaw integrates numerous areas for student development through the entire scheme of learning. These have been mapped across the year groups and across each of the Puzzles (units) to ensure that there is full coverage of development opportunities through the entire scheme – featuring in every Jigsaw Piece (lesson).

        Elements of each Jigsaw lesson will support student development of the emotional literacy domains: self-awareness, social skills, empathy, motivation and managing their feelings.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 cover financial education?

        There are numerous opportunities in Jigsaw for teaching and learning about financial capability and economic well-being. The Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

        For all year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be better in the future. Equally, the emphasis is on jobs and careers, and deciding on what is important in life.

      • What is featured in the 11-16 Jigsaw resources?

        Our handy Snapshot document shows what is taught in each year group.

        It also demonstrates progression and the spiral curriculum, with concepts and topics introduced from age 11 and repeated and built upon as students progress through the year groups.

        If you already have Jigsaw 11-16, the Snapshot document is included in your ‘Launch Pack’ which you can download after you log into the Jigsaw 11-16 website.

      • How will Jigsaw 11-16 work in my mixed-ability group?

        The lessons in Jigsaw 11-16 are mindful of many different learning styles, so there will be plenty of opportunities for students to learn in different ways, for example, in groups, individually, in pairs, using different media, and for different purposes.

        It is possible to differentiate the materials further because all year groups study the same Puzzle (unit) at the same time (but at their own level).

        This means that you can pull up onto your computer screen, the relevant lessons for that unit from different year groups and thereby select learning activities that will best suit your students’ needs/abilities.

      • How is mindfulness developed in Jigsaw 11-16 lessons?

        In Jigsaw PSHE, mindfulness is developed in two ways:
        Through the mindfulness practice in each Piece (lesson). This consists of breathing techniques, awareness exercises, and visualisations.

        Through the unfolding of mindfulness philosophy within the lessons. For example, this might be explaining how the brain works, how thought-processes happen and the potential consequences of this; it would then explain how the mind can be best used in the context of whatever PSHE content is being covered, for instance, when making decisions about relationships or using alcohol.

        There is a short mindfulness practice script included with each lesson plan for the teacher to read. To make this even easier, there is also an audio file embedded into one of the early slides in every lesson’s slide show presentation.

        We know this approach is invaluable, so we invite you to try it and encourage your students to persevere and practise this to enable the positive impact it can have.

        We have produced a short video that explains how and why mindfulness is used in Jigsaw lessons, which you will also find in the Community Area.

        This is to explain to students and staff why there is mindfulness practice in Jigsaw lessons, and may be used to explain the concept to parents/carers too.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 teach students about relationships?

        Jigsaw 11-16 contains inclusive Relationship, Sexuality and Health Education, meeting statutory requirements for RSE within the whole-school Programme.

        There is a mapping document showing how Jigsaw meets the outcomes, in the Inspection Materials and of course in the schools Community Area. In this you can see how different aspects of relationships education is included across all six Puzzles.

        One of the six Puzzles (units) in Jigsaw 11-16 is called ‘Relationships’ and is dedicated to exploring the relationships we have with ourselves and with others.

        Indeed, the relationship with self (self-awareness, self-identity, innate qualities and skills of resilience, self-esteem) is the vital starting point, which has an impact on everything else, from decisions regarding health to relationships chosen.

        Positive and successful relationships with others stem from this initial starting point, including others in friendships, family, communities and as a global citizen. Skills of empathy, intimacy, communication, negotiation and conflict-resolution are enabled through the whole of Jigsaw from ages 3 up to 16, as appropriate at different ages and stages of development.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 teach students about sex, sexual relationships and sexual health?

        The Jigsaw Sex Education Pieces (lessons) aim to give students their entitlement to information about puberty, human reproduction, sexual health, consent and all related aspects expected in the RSE Guidance appropriate to their age and stage of development.

        It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear. We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values.

        There is a strong safeguarding element to this work. The materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit appropriately with the philosophy and ethos of their setting.

        Schools with religious character will obviously need to check their own diocesan/organisation’s advice during this process.

      • Are there any lessons in Jigsaw 11-16 on mental health?

        There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, helps students learn about, improve and sustain good mental health, and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health.

        Jigsaw contains lessons explaining mental illness e.g. eating disorders/self-harm etc but chooses also to emphasise how to gain and maintain positive mental health.

        For example, each lesson is represented on a mapping document which states which of the five emotional literacy domains are contributed to, so the purpose of that lesson is clear, in terms of student development and not just their ‘knowledge learning’. This document can be found in the Community area under the ‘Documents’ tile.

        Confidence in oneself, awareness of self-identity and authentic self-esteem – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes difficult for students to develop. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping students to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners.

        Mindfulness philosophy and practice (through which students learn to be aware of their thoughts and feelings in the present moment – without judgement and to direct their minds to focus on whatever they choose to focus on) is included at the start of each Jigsaw lesson and uses visualisation and breathing techniques. This philosophy is woven through many lessons to enhance student’s understanding and how it assists positively in real-life situations.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness and this aims to empower students to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them safely and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives.

        It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it, allaying and managing stress and anxiety and helping grow gratitude and appreciation, a positive psychology towards life.

        The latest guidance recommends that schools need to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learned by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw 3-16 develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every age group.

        A programme like Jigsaw is so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how students learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health, which in turn builds their capacity to learn.

        Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for students and staff, and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values, but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.

      • Our school links PSHE to careers education. Does Jigsaw 11-16 help with this link?

        Jigsaw 11-16 resources can assist schools in their delivery of a robust and meaningful careers strategy. Indeed, the Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

        For all year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be achieved in the future. Equally, the emphasis is on jobs and careers, and deciding on what is important in life.

        Jigsaw 11-16 is mapped against the eight Benchmarks of good career guidance, developed by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation, to set a standard of excellence.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 ensure students are learning about their emotional health?

        Jigsaw integrates numerous areas for student development through the entire scheme of learning. These have been mapped across the year groups and across each of the Puzzles (units) to ensure that there is full coverage of development opportunities through the entire scheme – featuring in every Jigsaw Piece (lesson).

        Elements of each Jigsaw lesson will support student development of the emotional literacy domains: self-awareness, social skills, empathy, motivation and managing their feelings.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 cover financial education?

        There are numerous opportunities in Jigsaw for teaching and learning about financial capability and economic well-being. The Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

        For all year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be better in the future. Equally, the emphasis is on jobs and careers, and deciding on what is important in life.

      • What is featured in the 11-16 Jigsaw resources?

        Our handy Snapshot document shows what is taught in each year group.

        It also demonstrates progression and the spiral curriculum, with concepts and topics introduced from age 11 and repeated and built upon as students progress through the year groups.

        If you already have Jigsaw 11-16, the Snapshot document is included in your ‘Launch Pack’ which you can download after you log into the Jigsaw 11-16 website.

        If you haven’t got Jigsaw yet, you will find the Snapshot included with our free sample resources, which can request here.

      • How will Jigsaw 11-16 work in my mixed-ability group?

        The lessons in Jigsaw 11-16 are mindful of many different learning styles, so there will be plenty of opportunities for students to learn in different ways, for example, in groups, individually, in pairs, using different media, and for different purposes.

        It is possible to differentiate the materials further because all year groups study the same Puzzle (unit) at the same time (but at their own level).

        This means that you can pull up onto your computer screen, the relevant lessons for that unit from different year groups and thereby select learning activities that will best suit your students’ needs/abilities.

      • How is mindfulness developed in Jigsaw 11-16 lessons?

        In Jigsaw PSHE, mindfulness is developed in two ways:
        Through the mindfulness practice in each Piece (lesson). This consists of breathing techniques, awareness exercises, and visualisations.

        Through the unfolding of mindfulness philosophy within the lessons. For example, this might be explaining how the brain works, how thought-processes happen and the potential consequences of this; it would then explain how the mind can be best used in the context of whatever PSHE content is being covered, for instance, when making decisions about relationships or using alcohol.

        There is a short mindfulness practice script included with each lesson plan for the teacher to read. To make this even easier, there is also an audio file embedded into one of the early slides in every lesson’s slide show presentation.

        We know this approach is invaluable, so we invite you to try it and encourage your students to persevere and practise this to enable the positive impact it can have.

        We have produced a short video that explains how and why mindfulness is used in Jigsaw lessons, which you will also find in the Community Area.

        This is to explain to students and staff why there is mindfulness practice in Jigsaw lessons, and may be used to explain the concept to parents/carers too.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 teach students about relationships?

        Jigsaw 11-16 contains inclusive Relationship, Sex and Health Education, within the whole-school Programme. There is a mapping document showing how Jigsaw meets the outcomes, in the Inspection Materials and of course in the schools Community Area. In this you can see how different aspects of relationships education is included across all six Puzzles.

        One of the six Puzzles (units) in Jigsaw 11-16 is called ‘Relationships’ and is dedicated to exploring the relationships we have with ourselves and with others.

        Indeed, the relationship with self (self-awareness, self-identity, innate qualities and skills of resilience, self-esteem) is the vital starting point, which has an impact on everything else, from decisions regarding health to relationships chosen.

        Positive and successful relationships with others stem from this initial starting point, including others in friendships, family, communities and as a global citizen. Skills of empathy, intimacy, communication, negotiation and conflict-resolution are enabled through the whole of Jigsaw from ages 3 up to 16, as appropriate at different ages and stages of development.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 teach students about sex, sexual relationships and sexual health?

        The Jigsaw Sex Education Pieces (lessons) aim to give students their entitlement to information about puberty, human reproduction, sexual health, consent as appropriate to their age and stage of development.

        It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear. We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values.

        There is a strong safeguarding element to this work. The materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit appropriately with the philosophy and ethos of their setting.

        Schools with religious character will obviously need to check their own diocesan/organisation’s advice during this process.

      • Are there any lessons in Jigsaw 11-16 on mental health?

        There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, helps students learn about, improve and sustain good mental health, and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health.

        Jigsaw contains lessons explaining mental illness e.g. eating disorders/self-harm etc but chooses also to emphasise how to gain and maintain positive mental health.

        For example, each lesson is represented on a mapping document which states which of the five emotional literacy domains are contributed to, so the purpose of that lesson is clear, in terms of student development and not just their ‘knowledge learning’. This document can be found in the Community area under the ‘Documents’ tile.

        Confidence in oneself, awareness of self-identity and authentic self-esteem – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes difficult for students to develop. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping students to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners.

        Mindfulness philosophy and practice (through which students learn to be aware of their thoughts and feelings in the present moment – without judgement and to direct their minds to focus on whatever they choose to focus on) is included at the start of each Jigsaw lesson and uses visualisation and breathing techniques. This philosophy is woven through many lessons to enhance student’s understanding and how it assists positively in real-life situations.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness and this aims to empower students to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them safely and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives.

        It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it, allaying and managing stress and anxiety and helping grow gratitude and appreciation, a positive psychology towards life.

        The latest guidance recommends that schools need to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learned by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw 3-16 develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every age group.

        A programme like Jigsaw is so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how students learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health, which in turn builds their capacity to learn.

        Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for students and staff, and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values, but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.

      • Our school links PSHE to careers education. Does Jigsaw 11-16 help with this link?

        Jigsaw 11-16 resources can assist schools in their delivery of a robust and meaningful careers strategy. Indeed, the Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

        For all year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be achieved in the future. Equally, the emphasis is on jobs and careers, and deciding on what is important in life.

        Jigsaw 11-16 is mapped against the eight Benchmarks of good career guidance, developed by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation, to set a standard of excellence.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 ensure students are learning about their emotional health?

        Jigsaw integrates numerous areas for student development through the entire scheme of learning.

        These have been mapped across the year groups and across each of the Puzzles (units) to ensure that there is full coverage of development opportunities through the entire scheme – featuring in every Jigsaw Piece (lesson).

        Elements of each Jigsaw lesson will support student development of the emotional literacy domains: self-awareness, social skills, empathy, motivation and managing their feelings.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 cover financial education?

        There are numerous opportunities in Jigsaw for teaching and learning about financial capability and economic well-being. The Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

        For all year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be better in the future. Equally, the emphasis is on jobs and careers, and deciding on what is important in life.

      • What is featured in the 11-16 Jigsaw resources?

        Our handy Snapshot document shows what is taught in each year group.

        It also demonstrates progression and the spiral curriculum, with concepts and topics introduced from age 11 and repeated and built upon as students progress through the year groups.

        If you already have Jigsaw 11-16, the Snapshot document is included in your ‘Launch Pack’ which you can download after you log into the Jigsaw 11-16 website.

      • How will Jigsaw 11-16 work in my mixed-ability group?

        The lessons in Jigsaw 11-16 are mindful of many different learning styles, so there will be plenty of opportunities for students to learn in different ways, for example, in groups, individually, in pairs, using different media, and for different purposes.

        It is possible to differentiate the materials further because all year groups study the same Puzzle (unit) at the same time (but at their own level).

        This means that you can pull up onto your computer screen, the relevant lessons for that unit from different year groups and thereby select learning activities that will best suit your students’ needs/abilities.

      • How is mindfulness developed in Jigsaw 11-16 lessons?

        In Jigsaw PSHE, mindfulness is developed in two ways:
        Through the mindfulness practice in each Piece (lesson). This consists of breathing techniques, awareness exercises, and visualisations.

        Through the unfolding of mindfulness philosophy within the lessons. For example, this might be explaining how the brain works, how thought-processes happen and the potential consequences of this; it would then explain how the mind can be best used in the context of whatever PSHE content is being covered, for instance, when making decisions about relationships or using alcohol.

        There is a short mindfulness practice script included with each lesson plan for the teacher to read. To make this even easier, there is also an audio file embedded into one of the early slides in every lesson’s slide show presentation.

        We know this approach is invaluable, so we invite you to try it and encourage your students to persevere and practise this to enable the positive impact it can have.

        We have produced a short video that explains how and why mindfulness is used in Jigsaw lessons, which you will also find in the Community Area.

        This is to explain to students and staff why there is mindfulness practice in Jigsaw lessons, and may be used to explain the concept to parents/carers too.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 teach students about relationships?

        Jigsaw 11-16 contains inclusive Relationship, Sex and Health Education, which we have mapped directly to the 2022 Statutory RSE for Wales, as well as the HWB Curriculum, There is a mapping document showing how Jigsaw meets the outcomes, in the Jigsaw Launch Pack, the Inspection Materials and in the schools Community Area.

        One of the six Puzzles (units) in Jigsaw 11-16 is called ‘Relationships’ and is dedicated to exploring the relationships we have with ourselves and with others.

        Indeed, the relationship with self (self-awareness, self-identity, innate qualities and skills of resilience, self-esteem) is the vital starting point, which has an impact on everything else, from decisions regarding health to relationships chosen.

        Positive and successful relationships with others stem from this initial starting point, including others in friendships, family, communities and as a global citizen.

        Skills of empathy, intimacy, communication, negotiation and conflict-resolution are enabled through the whole of Jigsaw from ages 3 up to 16, as appropriate at different ages and stages of development.

      • Does Jigsaw 11-16 teach students about sex, sexual relationships and sexual health?

        It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear. We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values.

        There is a strong safeguarding element to this work. The materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit appropriately with the philosophy and ethos of their setting.

        Schools with religious character will obviously need to check their own diocesan/organisation’s advice during this process.

        Sample policy documents have been added to the Community Area of the Jigsaw website to assist schools in updating their policy.

        Note that Jigsaw 11-16 fulfils the requirements for statutory RSE issued by the Welsh Government in 2022.

      • Are there any lessons in Jigsaw 11-16 on mental health?

        There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, helps students learn about, improve and sustain good mental health, and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health.

        Jigsaw contains lessons explaining mental illness e.g. eating disorders/self-harm etc but chooses also to emphasise how to gain and maintain positive mental health.

        For example, each lesson is represented on a mapping document which states which of the five emotional literacy domains are contributed to, so the purpose of that lesson is clear, in terms of student development and not just their ‘knowledge learning’. This document can be found in the Community area under the ‘Documents’ tile.

        Confidence in oneself, awareness of self-identity and authentic self-esteem – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes difficult for students to develop. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping students to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners.

        Mindfulness philosophy and practice (through which students learn to be aware of their thoughts and feelings in the present moment – without judgement and to direct their minds to focus on whatever they choose to focus on) is included at the start of each Jigsaw lesson and uses visualisation and breathing techniques. This philosophy is woven through many lessons to enhance student’s understanding and how it assists positively in real-life situations.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness and this aims to empower students to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them safely and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives.

        It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it, allaying and managing stress and anxiety and helping grow gratitude and appreciation, a positive psychology towards life.

        The latest guidance recommends that schools need to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learned by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw 3-16 develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every age group.

        A programme like Jigsaw is so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how students learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health, which in turn builds their capacity to learn.

        Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for students and staff, and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values, but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.

      • Our school links PSHE to careers education. Does Jigsaw 11-16 help with this link?

        Jigsaw 11-16 resources can assist schools in their delivery of a robust and meaningful careers strategy. Indeed, the Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

        For all year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be achieved in the future. Equally, the emphasis is on jobs and careers, and deciding on what is important in life.

        Jigsaw 11-16 is mapped against the eight Benchmarks of good career guidance, developed by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation, to set a standard of excellence.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 ensure students are learning about their emotional health?

        Jigsaw integrates numerous areas for student development through the entire scheme of learning. These have been mapped across the year groups and across each of the Puzzles (units) to ensure that there is full coverage of development opportunities through the entire scheme – featuring in every Jigsaw Piece (lesson).

        Elements of each Jigsaw lesson will support student development of the emotional literacy domains: self-awareness, social skills, empathy, motivation and managing their feelings.

      • How does Jigsaw 11-16 cover financial education?

        There are numerous opportunities in Jigsaw for teaching and learning about financial capability and economic well-being. The Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

        For all year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be better in the future. Equally, the emphasis is on jobs and careers, and deciding on what is important in life.

    • Common Student Questions

      • How will Jigsaw 11-16 help me in my life?

        Jigsaw 11-16 is a universal programme and will be relevant to most students today. If you require more input on a specific topic, your school setting will need to provide or suggest targeted support services appropriate to need. In addition to this, Jigsaw 11-16 can help by providing useful places to find more information and, as such each lesson ends with signposting: the final presentation slide of each lesson features links to useful websites that are relevant to the messages of the lesson. 
         
        In addition, your PSHE / Health & Well-being teacher is free to add local websites and/or services to keep them relevant to where you live and study.
         
        Jigsaw 11-16 is co-produced with teachers and students and it is our aim to ensure it is as relevant to young people’s real lives as possible. This is a challenge for a universal curriculum programme and we encourage teachers to use it as their underpinning structure and to add specifics relevant to their school community when necessary.
         
        Jigsaw 11-16 provides well-researched lessons covering essential areas in the development of a student’s life. It helps build self-esteem and resilience while encouraging you to recognise your own strengths. This process enables students to make healthy and positive decisions in their lives. Looking after the mental and physical health of students is a major focus for Jigsaw.
         
        A student who is able to develop strategies to deal with teenage life will be more equipped to succeed both at school and in later life.
      • How is Jigsaw 11-16 different from the PSHE/life skills my school has been doing before?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been co-developed by the Jigsaw specialist team with students, teachers and key stakeholders from young people’s services, and was trialled extensively in schools across the UK, Europe and the USA.
         
        Focus on mental health is evident throughout the scheme. The Jigsaw team is passionate about mental health being a pre-requisite for successful learning, for health, happiness and positive life choices. It is also crucial for understanding that young people need to be empowered to understand themselves and their minds in order to combat stress, pressure and influences that may cause them harm.
         
        The content is student-driven and is in line with the most recent national guidance. Jigsaw 11-16 remains a universal, core programme that will be added to and updated regularly to accommodate changing needs and contexts.
         
        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been mapped fully to the PSHE Association Programme of Study (2020) and amply covers all the expectations and outcomes, comfortably meeting the statutory requirements set out in the DfE 2019 guidance, contributing to the 2019 Ofsted framework plus so much more.
      • What will I learn about in Jigsaw 11-16 lessons?

        Your school can provide a snapshot overview which shows what you will learn from age 11 to age 16 in the Jigsaw 11-16 programme. This Snapshot is supplied to your school in their Jigsaw Launch Pack and is also in our Inspection Materials (for schools that have not yet purchased Jigsaw 11-16).

      • Why is mindfulness taught in each Jigsaw 11-16 lesson?

        At Jigsaw, we believe that the practice of mindfulness, where students learn to be in the present moment without judgement, needs to be taught in every Jigsaw lesson – through the mindfulness practice time, through visualisation and breathing techniques.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness and this aims to empower your learning, and improve your life-chances later, and to help you develop personal awareness.

        Mindfulness practice simply enables you to observe your own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about your learning, behaviour and life. It helps you to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in that moment.

      • How will Jigsaw 11-16 help me in my life?

        Jigsaw 11-16 is a universal programme and will be relevant to most students today. If you require more input on a specific topic, your school setting will need to provide or suggest targeted support services appropriate to need. In addition to this, Jigsaw 11-16 can help by providing useful places to find more information and, as such each lesson ends with signposting: the final presentation slide of each lesson features links to useful websites that are relevant to the messages of the lesson. 
         
        In addition, your PSHE / Health & Well-being teacher is free to add local websites and/or services to keep them relevant to where you live and study.
         
        Jigsaw 11-16 is co-produced with teachers and students and it is our aim to ensure it is as relevant to young people’s real lives as possible. This is a challenge for a universal curriculum programme and we encourage teachers to use it as their underpinning structure and to add specifics relevant to their school community when necessary.
         
        Jigsaw 11-16 provides well-researched lessons covering essential areas in the development of a student’s life. It helps build self-esteem and resilience while encouraging you to recognise your own strengths. This process enables students to make healthy and positive decisions in their lives. Looking after the mental and physical health of students is a major focus for Jigsaw.
         
        A student who is able to develop strategies to deal with teenage life will be more equipped to succeed both at school and in later life.
      • How is Jigsaw 11-16 different from the PSHE/life skills my school has been doing before?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been co-developed by the Jigsaw specialist team with students, teachers and key stakeholders from young people’s services, and was trialled extensively in schools across the UK, Europe and the USA.
         
        Focus on mental health is evident throughout the scheme. The Jigsaw team is passionate about mental health being a pre-requisite for successful learning, for health, happiness and positive life choices. It is also crucial for understanding that young people need to be empowered to understand themselves and their minds in order to combat stress, pressure and influences that may cause them harm.
         
        The content is student-driven and is in line with the most recent national guidance. Jigsaw 11-16 remains a universal, core programme that will be added to and updated regularly to accommodate changing needs and contexts.
         
        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been mapped fully to the PSHE Association Programme of Study (2020) and amply covers all the expectations and outcomes, comfortably meeting the statutory requirements set out in the DfE 2019 guidance, contributing to the 2019 Ofsted framework plus so much more.
      • What will I learn about in Jigsaw 11-16 lessons?

        Your school can provide a snapshot overview which shows what you will learn from age 11 to age 16 in the Jigsaw 11-16 programme. This Snapshot is supplied to your school in their Jigsaw Launch Pack and is also in our Inspection Materials (for schools that have not yet purchased Jigsaw 11-16).

      • Why is mindfulness taught in each Jigsaw 11-16 lesson?

        At Jigsaw, we believe that the practice of mindfulness, where students learn to be in the present moment without judgement, needs to be taught in every Jigsaw lesson – through the mindfulness practice time, through visualisation and breathing techniques.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness and this aims to empower your learning, and improve your life-chances later, and to help you develop personal awareness.

        Mindfulness practice simply enables you to observe your own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about your learning, behaviour and life. It helps you to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in that moment.

      • How will Jigsaw 11-16 help me in my life?

        Jigsaw 11-16 is a universal programme and will be relevant to most students today. If you require more input on a specific topic, your school setting will need to provide or suggest targeted support services appropriate to need. In addition to this, Jigsaw 11-16 can help by providing useful places to find more information and, as such each lesson ends with signposting: the final presentation slide of each lesson features links to useful websites that are relevant to the messages of the lesson. 
         
        In addition, your PSHE / Health & Well-being teacher is free to add local websites and/or services to keep them relevant to where you live and study.
         
        Jigsaw 11-16 is co-produced with teachers and students and it is our aim to ensure it is as relevant to young people’s real lives as possible. This is a challenge for a universal curriculum programme and we encourage teachers to use it as their underpinning structure and to add specifics relevant to their school community when necessary.
         
        Jigsaw 11-16 provides well-researched lessons covering essential areas in the development of a student’s life. It helps build self-esteem and resilience while encouraging you to recognise your own strengths. This process enables students to make healthy and positive decisions in their lives. Looking after the mental and physical health of students is a major focus for Jigsaw.
         
        A student who is able to develop strategies to deal with teenage life will be more equipped to succeed both at school and in later life.
      • How is Jigsaw 11-16 different from the PSHE/life skills my school has been doing before?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been co-developed by the Jigsaw specialist team with students, teachers and key stakeholders from young people’s services, and was trialled extensively in schools across the UK, Europe and the USA.
         
        Focus on mental health is evident throughout the scheme. The Jigsaw team is passionate about mental health being a pre-requisite for successful learning, for health, happiness and positive life choices. It is also crucial for understanding that young people need to be empowered to understand themselves and their minds in order to combat stress, pressure and influences that may cause them harm.
         
        The content is student-driven and is in line with the most recent national guidance. Jigsaw 11-16 remains a universal, core programme that will be added to and updated regularly to accommodate changing needs and contexts.
         
        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been mapped fully to the PSHE Association Programme of Study (2020) and amply covers all the expectations and outcomes, comfortably meeting the statutory requirements set out in the DfE 2019 guidance, contributing to the 2019 Ofsted framework plus so much more.
      • What will I learn about in Jigsaw 11-16 lessons?

        Your school can provide a snapshot overview which shows what you will learn from age 11 to age 16 in the Jigsaw 11-16 programme. This Snapshot is supplied to your school in their Jigsaw Launch Pack and is also in our Inspection Materials (for schools that have not yet purchased Jigsaw 11-16).

      • Why is mindfulness taught in each Jigsaw 11-16 lesson?

        At Jigsaw, we believe that the practice of mindfulness, where students learn to be in the present moment without judgement, needs to be taught in every Jigsaw lesson – through the mindfulness practice time, through visualisation and breathing techniques.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness and this aims to empower your learning, and improve your life-chances later, and to help you develop personal awareness.

        Mindfulness practice simply enables you to observe your own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about your learning, behaviour and life. It helps you to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in that moment.

      • How will Jigsaw 11-16 help me in my life?

        Jigsaw 11-16 is a universal programme and will be relevant to most students today. If you require more input on a specific topic, your school setting will need to provide or suggest targeted support services appropriate to need.
         
        In addition to this, Jigsaw 11-16 can help by providing useful places to find more information and, as such each lesson ends with signposting: the final presentation slide of each lesson features links to useful websites that are relevant to the messages of the lesson. 
         
        In addition, your PSHE / Health & Well-being teacher is free to add local websites and/or services to keep them relevant to where you live and study.
         
        Jigsaw 11-16 is co-produced with teachers and students and it is our aim to ensure it is as relevant to young people’s real lives as possible. This is a challenge for a universal curriculum programme and we encourage teachers to use it as their underpinning structure and to add specifics relevant to their school community when necessary.
         
        Jigsaw 11-16 provides well-researched lessons covering essential areas in the development of a student’s life. It helps build self-esteem and resilience while encouraging you to recognise your own strengths. This process enables students to make healthy and positive decisions in their lives. Looking after the mental and physical health of students is a major focus for Jigsaw.
         
        A student who is able to develop strategies to deal with teenage life will be more equipped to succeed both at school and in later life.
      • How is Jigsaw 11-16 different from the PSHE/life skills my school has been doing before?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been co-developed by the Jigsaw specialist team with students, teachers and key stakeholders from young people’s services, and was trialled extensively in schools across the UK, Europe and the USA.
         
        Focus on mental health is evident throughout the scheme. The Jigsaw team is passionate about mental health being a pre-requisite for successful learning, for health, happiness and positive life choices. It is also crucial for understanding that young people need to be empowered to understand themselves and their minds in order to combat stress, pressure and influences that may cause them harm.
         
        The content is student-driven and is in line with the most recent national guidance. Jigsaw 11-16 remains a universal, core programme that will be added to and updated regularly to accommodate changing needs and contexts.
         
        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been mapped fully to the PSHE Association Programme of Study (2020) and amply covers all the expectations and outcomes, comfortably meeting the statutory requirements set out in the DfE 2019 guidance, contributing to the 2019 Ofsted framework plus so much more.
      • What will I learn about in Jigsaw 11-16 lessons?

        Your school can provide a snapshot overview which shows what you will learn from age 11 to age 16 in the Jigsaw 11-16 programme. This Snapshot is supplied to your school in their Jigsaw Launch Pack and is also in our Inspection Materials (for schools that have not yet purchased Jigsaw 11-16).

      • Why is mindfulness taught in each Jigsaw 11-16 lesson?

        At Jigsaw, we believe that the practice of mindfulness, where students learn to be in the present moment without judgement, needs to be taught in every Jigsaw lesson – through the mindfulness practice time, through visualisation and breathing techniques.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness and this aims to empower your learning, and improve your life-chances later, and to help you develop personal awareness.

        Mindfulness practice simply enables you to observe your own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about your learning, behaviour and life. It helps you to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in that moment.

      • How will Jigsaw 11-16 help me in my life?

        Jigsaw 11-16 is a universal programme and will be relevant to most students today. If you require more input on a specific topic, your school setting will need to provide or suggest targeted support services appropriate to need. In addition to this, Jigsaw 11-16 can help by providing useful places to find more information and, as such each lesson ends with signposting: the final presentation slide of each lesson features links to useful websites that are relevant to the messages of the lesson. In addition, your PSHE / Health & Well-being teacher is free to add local websites and/or services to keep them relevant to where you live and study.

        Jigsaw 11-16 is co-produced with teachers and students and it is our aim to ensure it is as relevant to young people’s real lives as possible. This is a challenge for a universal curriculum programme and we encourage teachers to use it as their underpinning structure and to add specifics relevant to their school community when necessary.

        Jigsaw 11-16 provides well-researched lessons covering essential areas in the development of a student’s life. It helps build self-esteem and resilience while encouraging you to recognise your own strengths. This process enables students to make healthy and positive decisions in their lives. Looking after the mental and physical health of students is a major focus for Jigsaw.

        A student who is able to develop strategies to deal with teenage life will be more equipped to succeed both at school and in later life.

      • How is Jigsaw 11-16 different from the PSHE/life skills my school has been doing before?

        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been co-developed by the Jigsaw specialist team with students, teachers and key stakeholders from young people’s services, and was trialled extensively in schools across the UK, Europe and the USA.

        Focus on mental health is evident throughout the scheme. The Jigsaw team is passionate about mental health being a pre-requisite for successful learning, for health, happiness and positive life choices. It is also crucial for understanding that young people need to be empowered to understand themselves and their minds in order to combat stress, pressure and influences that may cause them harm.

        The content is student-driven and is in line with the most recent national guidance. Jigsaw 11-16 remains a universal, core programme that will be added to and updated regularly to accommodate changing needs and contexts.

        The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been mapped fully to the PSHE Association Programme of Study (2017) and amply covers all the expectations and outcomes, comfortably meeting the statutory requirements set out in the DfE 2019 guidance, contributing to the 2019 Ofsted framework plus so much more.

      • What will I learn about in Jigsaw 11-16 lessons?

        Your school can provide a snapshot overview which shows what you will learn from age 11 to age 16 in the Jigsaw 11-16 programme. This Snapshot is supplied to your school in their Jigsaw Launch Pack and is also in our Inspection Materials (for schools that have not yet purchased Jigsaw 11-16).

      • Why is mindfulness taught in each Jigsaw 11-16 lesson?

        At Jigsaw, we believe that the practice of mindfulness, where students learn to be in the present moment without judgement, needs to be taught in every Jigsaw lesson – through the mindfulness practice time, through visualisation and breathing techniques.

        The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness and this aims to empower your learning, and improve your life-chances later, and to help you develop personal awareness.

        Mindfulness practice simply enables you to observe your own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about your learning, behaviour and life. It helps you to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in that moment.

    Contact us

    Have any questions? We'd love to hear from you. 

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